A call for a systems-thinking approach to medication adherence: Stop blaming the patient

Citation:

Lauffenburger JC, Choudhry NK. A call for a systems-thinking approach to medication adherence: Stop blaming the patient. JAMA Internal Medicine 2018;178(7):950-951.
PDF0 bytes

Abstract:

The writing of a prescription has long been one of the most expected steps to occur at the end of a physician-patient encounter. The subsequent events are assumed to follow a natural order: patients fill their prescriptions at a pharmacy and then continue to use their medications as prescribed. Unfortunately, these assumptions often do not hold. The challenges of consistent medication use, often called secondary adherence or persistence, have been well characterized by decades of research estimating that, on average, fewer than half of patients use their medications as prescribed over the long-term and many stop using their medications within months of beginning.1 Much less well appreciated has been primary nonadherence, where patients do not fill the initial prescriptions they are given.

Notes:

10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.0790

Last updated on 07/19/2018