The cost-effectiveness of C-reactive protein testing and rosuvastatin treatment for patients with normal cholesterol levels

Citation:

Choudhry NK, Patrick AR, Glynn RJ, Avorn J. The cost-effectiveness of C-reactive protein testing and rosuvastatin treatment for patients with normal cholesterol levels [Internet]. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 2011;57:784-91.
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Date Published:

Feb 15

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of applying the JUPITER (Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin) trial results into clinical practice. BACKGROUND: The JUPITER trial found that rosuvastatin reduces vascular events in apparently healthy subjects with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) but normal low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. The implications of expanding treatment recommendations based on these results have not been evaluated. METHODS: We constructed a cost-effectiveness model of men >/=50 years and women >/=60 years with LDL cholesterol levels of <130 mg/dl and no known cardiovascular disease. We compared: 1) hs-CRP testing followed by rosuvastatin treatment for patients with hs-CRP levels >/=2.0 mg/l; and 2) usual care (i.e., no testing and no treatment). Estimates of treatment effectiveness were based on the JUPITER trial and were varied in sensitivity analyses. RESULTS: Among patients with LDL <130 mg/dl and hs-CRP levels >/=2.0 mg/l, rosuvastatin had an incremental cost-effectiveness of $25,198 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained compared to usual care. If the effectiveness of rosuvastatin were 50% of that observed in JUPITER, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio would increase to $50,871 per QALY. Implementing this strategy only in patients with a Framingham risk score >/=10% yielded an incremental cost-effectiveness of $14,205 per QALY. Among such intermediate-risk patients, a JUPITER-based strategy becomes cost-saving at a rosuvastatin price of <$0.86 per day. CONCLUSIONS: Rosuvastatin treatment for JUPITER-eligible patients appears to be cost-effective, particularly among those with a Framingham risk score >/=10%.

Notes:

Choudhry, Niteesh KPatrick, Amanda RGlynn, Robert JAvorn, JerryUnited StatesJournal of the American College of CardiologyJ Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Feb 15;57(7):784-91.

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Last updated on 02/02/2016