The international pharmaceutical market as a source of low-cost prescription drugs for U.S. patients

Citation:

Kesselheim AS, Choudhry NK. The international pharmaceutical market as a source of low-cost prescription drugs for U.S. patients [Internet]. Annals of Internal Medicine 2008;148:614-9.
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Date Published:

Apr 15

Abstract:

In response to increasing prescription drug costs, more U.S. patients and policymakers are importing less-expensive pharmaceutical products from other countries. Large-scale prescription drug importation is currently illegal, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration permits individuals to bring in 90-day supplies of drugs for personal use. As patient use of foreign-bought drugs has increased, federal legislators have continued to debate the full legalization of importation. Three factors help guide whether U.S. patients and policymakers can rely on other countries as sources of imported prescription drugs: whether the safety of the product can be ensured, how the import price compares with domestic prices, and how importation might affect the exporting country's pharmaceutical market. In wealthier countries with active regulatory systems, drug safety can be adequately ensured, and brand-name products are usually less expensive than in the United States (although generic drugs may be more expensive). However, implementing large-scale importation can negatively impact the originating country's market and can diminish the long-term cost savings for U.S. consumers. In low- and middle-income countries, prices may be reduced for both brand-name and generic drugs, but the prevalence of unauthorized products on the market makes ensuring drug safety more difficult. It may be reasonable for individual U.S. consumers to purchase essential medicines from certain international markets, but the most effective way to decrease drug costs overall is the appropriate use of domestic generic drugs, which are available for almost every major therapeutic class.

Notes:

Kesselheim, Aaron SChoudhry, Niteesh KUnited StatesAnnals of internal medicineAnn Intern Med. 2008 Apr 15;148(8):614-9.

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Last updated on 02/02/2016