Unintended Consequences of a Medicaid Prescription Copayment Policy

Citation:

Lieberman DA, Polinski JM, Choudhry NK, Avorn J, Fischer MA. Unintended Consequences of a Medicaid Prescription Copayment Policy [Internet]. Medical Care 2014;52(5):10.1097/MLR.0000000000000119.
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Abstract:

Background and Objectives:Medication copayments can influence patient choices. We evaluated 2 copayment policies implemented by Massachusetts Medicaid incentivizing the use of selected generic medications.Research Design and Measures:In 2009, Massachusetts Medicaid copayments were $1 for generics and $3 for brands. On February 1, 2009, copayments for generic antihypertensives, antihyperlipidemics, and hypoglycemics (target medications) remained at $1, whereas copayments for all nontarget generics increased to $2 (policy #1) and $3 on July 1, 2010 (policy #2). Using state-level, aggregate prescription data, we developed interrupted time-series models with controls to evaluate the impact of these policies on use of target generics, target brands, and nontarget essential medications (defined as medications required for ongoing treatment of serious medical conditions).

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Last updated on 04/16/2014