Courses

Ec 2325 Comparative Historical Economic Development (Spring 2021)

The course uses a historical and comparative approach to understanding the evolution and development of societies. In particular, we will examine research that asks whether differences in economic development today have historical roots. In addition, we will study different mechanisms and channels through which history matters. Particular attention will be paid to the role of domestic institutions and culture in explaining historical persistence.

While the material covered in the course is grounded in the field of economic history, there is a natural overlap with other fields in economics, particularly development economics, political economy, and cultural economics, as well as overlap with other disciplines, such as history, psychology, political science, anthropology, archaeology, and geography.

The course is targeted to second-year Ph.D. students in economics. It is not open to Undergraduate or Masters students. The course fulfills the distribution requirement.

Ec 2904 Early Stage Research and Discussions on Historical Economic Development  (Full Year 2020-2021)

Students discuss their research in historical economic development. It is primarily, but not exclusively, for doctoral students in economics who have finished their first-year core courses. 

Ec 2910 Early Stage Research and Discussions in Political Economy and Culture (Full Year 2020-2021)

The course is intended for PhD students interested in research withitn the field of political economy or cultural economics, both broadly defined. Students discuss their research ideas. It is primarily, but not exclusively, for doctoral students in economics who have finished their first-year core courses. 

Ec 3010: Alberto Alesina Graduate Student Workshop in Political Economy and Culture (Full Year 2020-2021)

The course is intended for students interested in research within the field of political economy or cultural economics, both broadly defined. Participants discuss research papers presented by scholars at Harvard and from elsewhere. They also present their own work in progress.