Publications

2017
Russell JR, Cabeen MT, Wiggins PA, Paulsson J, Losick R. Noise in a phosphorelay drives stochastic entry into sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. EMBO J. 2017.Abstract
Entry into sporulation in Bacillus subtilis is governed by a phosphorelay in which phosphoryl groups from a histidine kinase are successively transferred via relay proteins to the response regulator Spo0A. Spo0A~P, in turn, sets in motion events that lead to asymmetric division and activation of the cell-specific transcription factor σ(F), a hallmark for entry into sporulation. Here, we have used a microfluidics-based platform to investigate the activation of Spo0A and σ(F) in individual cells held under constant, sporulation-inducing conditions. The principal conclusions were that: (i) activation of σ(F) occurs with an approximately constant probability after adaptation to conditions of nutrient limitation; (ii) activation of σ(F) is tightly correlated with, and preceded by, Spo0A~P reaching a high threshold level; (iii) activation of Spo0A takes place abruptly just prior to asymmetric division; and (iv) the primary source of noise in the activation of Spo0A is the phosphorelay. We propose that cells exhibit a constant probability of attaining a high threshold level of Spo0A~P due to fluctuations in the flux of phosphoryl groups through the phosphorelay.
Smolentseva O, Gusarov I, Gautier L, Shamovsky I, DeFrancesco AS, Losick R, Nudler E. Mechanism of biofilm-mediated stress resistance and lifespan extension in C. elegans. Sci Rep. 2017;7 (1) :7137.Abstract
Bacteria naturally form communities of cells known as biofilms. However the physiological roles of biofilms produced by non-pathogenic microbiota remain largely unknown. To assess the impact of a biofilm on host physiology we explored the effect of several non-pathogenic biofilm-forming bacteria on Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Pseudomonas fluorescens induces C. elegans stress resistance. Biofilm also protects against pathogenic infection and prolongs lifespan. Total mRNA analysis identified a set of host genes that are upregulated in response to biofilm formation by B. subtilis. We further demonstrate that mtl-1 is responsible for the biofilm-mediated increase in oxidative stress resistance and lifespan extension. Induction of mtl-1 and hsp-70 promotes biofilm-mediated thermotolerance. ilys-2 activity accounts for biofilm-mediated resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa killing. These results reveal the importance of non-pathogenic biofilms for host physiology and provide a framework to study commensal biofilms in higher organisms.
Wang Erickson AF, Deighan P, Garcia CP, Weinzierl ROJ, Hochschild A, Losick R. An Amino Acid Substitution in RNA Polymerase That Inhibits the Utilization of an Alternative Sigma Factor. J Bacteriol. 2017;199 (14).Abstract
Sigma (σ) factors direct gene transcription by binding to and determining the promoter recognition specificity of RNA polymerase (RNAP) in bacteria. Genes transcribed under the control of alternative sigma factors allow cells to respond to stress and undergo developmental processes, such as sporulation in Bacillus subtilis, in which gene expression is controlled by a cascade of alternative sigma factors. Binding of sigma factors to RNA polymerase depends on the coiled-coil (or clamp helices) motif of the β' subunit. We have identified an amino acid substitution (L257P) in the coiled coil that markedly inhibits the function of σ(H), the earliest-acting alternative sigma factor in the sporulation cascade. Cells with this mutant RNAP exhibited an early and severe block in sporulation but not in growth. The mutant was strongly impaired in σ(H)-directed gene expression but not in the activity of the stress-response sigma factor σ(B) Pulldown experiments showed that the mutant RNAP was defective in associating with σ(H) but could still associate with σ(A) and σ(B) The differential effects of the L257P substitution on sigma factor binding to RNAP are likely due to a conformational change in the β' coiled coil that is specifically detrimental for interaction with σ(H) This is the first example, to our knowledge, of an amino acid substitution in RNAP that exhibits a strong differential effect on a particular alternative sigma factor.IMPORTANCE In bacteria, all transcription is mediated by a single multisubunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) enzyme. However, promoter-specific transcription initiation necessitates that RNAP associates with a σ factor. Bacteria contain a primary σ factor that directs transcription of housekeeping genes and alternative σ factors that direct transcription in response to environmental or developmental cues. We identified an amino acid substitution (L257P) in the B. subtilis β' subunit whereby RNAP(L257P) associates with some σ factors (σ(A) and σ(B)) and enables vegetative cell growth but is defective in utilization of σ(H) and is consequently blocked for sporulation. To our knowledge, this is the first identification of an amino acid substitution within the core enzyme that affects utilization of a specific sigma factor.
DeFrancesco AS, Masloboeva N, Syed AK, Deloughery A, Bradshaw N, Li G-W, Gilmore MS, Walker S, Losick R. Genome-wide screen for genes involved in eDNA release during biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114 (29) :E5969-E5978.Abstract
Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of both nosocomial and community-acquired infection. Biofilm formation at the site of infection reduces antimicrobial susceptibility and can lead to chronic infection. During biofilm formation, a subset of cells liberate cytoplasmic proteins and DNA, which are repurposed to form the extracellular matrix that binds the remaining cells together in large clusters. Using a strain that forms robust biofilms in vitro during growth under glucose supplementation, we carried out a genome-wide screen for genes involved in the release of extracellular DNA (eDNA). A high-density transposon insertion library was grown under biofilm-inducing conditions, and the relative frequency of insertions was compared between genomic DNA (gDNA) collected from cells in the biofilm and eDNA from the matrix. Transposon insertions into genes encoding functions necessary for eDNA release were identified by reduced representation in the eDNA. On direct testing, mutants of some of these genes exhibited markedly reduced levels of eDNA and a concomitant reduction in cell clustering. Among the genes with robust mutant phenotypes were gdpP, which encodes a phosphodiesterase that degrades the second messenger cyclic-di-AMP, and xdrA, the gene for a transcription factor that, as revealed by RNA-sequencing analysis, influences the expression of multiple genes, including many involved in cell wall homeostasis. Finally, we report that growth in biofilm-inducing medium lowers cyclic-di-AMP levels and does so in a manner that depends on the gdpP phosphodiesterase gene.
Wang Erickson AF, Deighan P, Chen S, Barrasso K, Garcia CP, Martínez-Lumbreras S, Alfano C, Krysztofinska EM, Thapaliya A, Camp AH, et al. A novel RNA polymerase-binding protein that interacts with a sigma-factor docking site. Mol Microbiol. 2017.Abstract
Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis is governed by a cascade of alternative RNA polymerase sigma factors. We previously identified a small protein Fin that is produced under the control of the sporulation sigma factor σ(F) to create a negative feedback loop that inhibits σ(F) -directed gene transcription. Cells deleted for fin are defective for spore formation and exhibit increased levels of σ(F) -directed gene transcription. Based on pull-down experiments, chemical crosslinking, bacterial two-hybrid experiments and nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift analysis, we now report that Fin binds to RNA polymerase and specifically to the coiled-coil region of the β' subunit. The coiled-coil is a docking site for sigma factors on RNA polymerase, and evidence is presented that the binding of Fin and σ(F) to RNA polymerase is mutually exclusive. We propose that Fin functions by a mechanism distinct from that of classic sigma factor antagonists (anti-σ factors), which bind directly to a target sigma factor to prevent its association with RNA polymerase, and instead functions to inhibit σ(F) by competing for binding to the β' coiled-coil.
Cabeen MT, Russell JR, Paulsson J, Losick R. Use of a microfluidic platform to uncover basic features of energy and environmental stress responses in individual cells of Bacillus subtilis. PLoS Genet. 2017;13 (7) :e1006901.Abstract
Bacteria use a variety of stress-sensing systems to sense and respond to diverse stressors and to ensure their survival under adverse conditions. The gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis responds to energy stress (ATP depletion) and to environmental stressors using two distinct stress-sensing pathways that converge on the alternative sigma factor σB to provoke a general stress response. Past efforts to study the σB stress response in bulk culture and on agarose pads were unable to visualize the responses of individual cells under tightly controlled conditions for extended periods of time. Here we use a microfluidics-based strategy to discern the basic features of σB activation in single cells in response to energy and environmental stress, both immediately upon stressor exposure and for tens of generations thereafter. Upon energy stress at various levels of stressor, cells exhibited fast, transient, and amplitude-modulated responses but not frequency modulation as previously reported. Upon environmental stress, which is mediated by the stressosome complex, wild-type cells primarily exhibited a transient and amplitude-modulated response. However, mutant cells producing only one of the four paralogous RsbR stressosome proteins showed striking and previously unseen differences. Whereas RsbRA-only cells mimicked the wild type, RsbRC-only cells displayed a slower but sustained overall response composed of repeated activation events in single cells.
Bradshaw N, Levdikov VM, Zimanyi CM, Gaudet R, Wilkinson AJ, Losick R. A widespread family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases shares a common regulatory switch with proteasomal proteases. Elife. 2017;6.Abstract
PP2C phosphatases control biological processes including stress responses, development, and cell division in all kingdoms of life. Diverse regulatory domains adapt PP2C phosphatases to specific functions, but how these domains control phosphatase activity was unknown. We present structures representing active and inactive states of the PP2C phosphatase SpoIIE from Bacillus subtilis. Based on structural analyses and genetic and biochemical experiments, we identify an α-helical switch that shifts a carbonyl oxygen into the active site to coordinate a metal cofactor. Our analysis indicates that this switch is widely conserved among PP2C family members, serving as a platform to control phosphatase activity in response to diverse inputs. Remarkably, the switch is shared with proteasomal proteases, which we identify as evolutionary and structural relatives of PP2C phosphatases. Although these proteases use an unrelated catalytic mechanism, rotation of equivalent helices controls protease activity by movement of the equivalent carbonyl oxygen into the active site.
2015
Cabeen MT, Losick R. Bacterial Backstabbing: EF-Tu, Brute?. Cell. 2015;163 (3) :537-9.Abstract
Bacterial type VI secretion is an offensive and defensive weapon that utilizes a molecular warhead to inject toxins into neighboring cells. In this issue of Cell, Whitney et al. report a new class of toxin that disrupts the core metabolism of recipient cells and uncover a surprising requirement for EF-Tu.
Bradshaw N, Losick R. Asymmetric division triggers cell-specific gene expression through coupled capture and stabilization of a phosphatase. Elife. 2015;4.Abstract
Formation of a division septum near a randomly chosen pole during sporulation in B. subtilis creates unequal sized daughter cells with dissimilar programs of gene expression. An unanswered question is how polar septation activates a transcription factor (σ(F)) selectively in the small cell. We present evidence that the upstream regulator of σ(F), the phosphatase SpoIIE, is compartmentalized in the small cell by transfer from the polar septum to the adjacent cell pole where SpoIIE is protected from proteolysis and activated. Polar recognition, protection from proteolysis, and stimulation of phosphatase activity are linked to oligomerization of SpoIIE. This mechanism for initiating cell-specific gene expression is independent of additional sporulation proteins; vegetative cells engineered to divide near a pole sequester SpoIIE and activate σ(F) in small cells. Thus, a simple model explains how SpoIIE responds to a stochastically-generated cue to activate σ(F) at the right time and in the right place.
Deloughery A, Dengler V, Chai Y, Losick R. Biofilm Formation by Bacillus subtilis Requires an Endoribonuclease-containing Multisubunit Complex that Controls mRNA Levels for the Matrix Gene Repressor SinR. Mol Microbiol. 2015.Abstract
Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is largely governed by a circuit in which the response regulator Spo0A turns on the gene for the anti-repressor SinI. SinI, in turn, binds to and inactivates SinR, a dedicated repressor of genes for matrix production. Mutants of the genes ylbF, ymcA, and yaaT are blocked in biofilm formation, but the mechanism by which they act has been mysterious. A recent report attributed their role in biofilm formation to stimulating Spo0A activity. However, we detect no measurable effect on the transcription of sinI. Instead, we find that the block in biofilm formation is caused by an increase in the levels of SinR and of its mRNA. Evidence is presented that YlbF, YmcA and YaaT interact with, and control the activity of, RNase Y, which is known to destabilize sinR mRNA. We show that the processing of another target of RNase Y, cggR-gapA mRNA, similarly depends on YlbF and YmcA. Our work suggests that sinR mRNA stability is an additional posttranscriptional control mechanism governing the switch to multicellularity and raises the possibility that YlbF, YmcA, and YaaT broadly regulate mRNA stability as part of an RNase Y-containing, multi-subunit complex.
Cabeen MT, Leiman SA, Losick R. Colony-morphology screening uncovers a role for the Pseudomonas aeruginosa nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system in biofilm formation. Mol Microbiol. 2015.Abstract
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen whose survival is aided by forming communities known as biofilms, in which cells are encased in a self-produced matrix. . We devised a mutant screen based on colony morphology to identify additional genes with previously unappreciated roles in biofilm formation. Our screen, which identified most known biofilm-related genes, also uncovered PA14_16550 and PA14_69700, deletions of which abrogated and augmented biofilm formation, respectively. We also identified ptsP, which encodes enzyme I of the nitrogen-regulated phosphotransferase (PTS(Ntr) ) system, as being important for cyclic-di-GMP production and for biofilm formation. Further experiments showed that biofilm formation is hindered in the absence of phosphotransfer through the PTS(Ntr) , but only in the presence of enzyme II (PtsN), the putative regulatory module of the PTS(Ntr) . These results implicate unphosphorylated PtsN as a negative regulator of biofilm formation and establish one of the first known roles of the PTS(Ntr) in P. aeruginosa.
Dengler V, Foulston L, DeFrancesco AS, Losick R. An Electrostatic Net Model for the Role of Extracellular DNA in Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus aureus. J Bacteriol. 2015.Abstract
Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that can form biofilms on various surfaces. These cell communities are protected from the environment by a self-produced extracellular matrix composed of proteins, DNA and polysaccharide. The exact composition and the role of the different components are not fully understood. In this study we investigate the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) and its interaction with the recently identified cytoplasmic proteins that have a moonlighting role in the biofilm matrix. These matrix proteins associate with the cell surface upon the drop in pH that naturally occurs during biofilm formation, and we found here that this association is independent of eDNA. Conversely, the association of eDNA with the matrix was dependent on matrix proteins. Both proteinase treatment and DNase treatment severely reduced clumping of resuspended biofilms; highlighting the importance of both proteins and eDNA in connecting cells together. By adding an excess of exogenous DNA to DNase treated biofilm, clumping was partially restored, confirming the crucial role of eDNA for the interconnection of cells. Based on our results we propose that eDNA acts as an electrostatic net, interconnecting cells surrounded by positively charged matrix proteins at low pH. IMPORTANCE: Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an important component of the biofilm matrix in diverse bacteria but its role in biofilm formation is not well understood. Here we report that in Staphylococcus aureus eDNA associates with cells in a manner that depends on matrix proteins and that eDNA is required for linking cells together in the biofilm. These results confirm previous studies that eDNA is an important component of the S. aureus biofilm matrix and also suggest that eDNA acts as an electrostatic net that tethers cells together via the proteinaceous layer of the biofilm matrix.
Norman TM, Lord ND, Paulsson J, Losick R. Stochastic Switching of Cell Fate in Microbes. Annu Rev Microbiol. 2015.Abstract
Microbes transiently differentiate into distinct, specialized cell types to generate functional diversity and cope with changing environmental conditions. Though alternate programs often entail radically different physiological and morphological states, recent single-cell studies have revealed that these crucial decisions are often left to chance. In these cases, the underlying genetic circuits leverage the intrinsic stochasticity of intracellular chemistry to drive transition between states. Understanding how these circuits transform transient gene expression fluctuations into lasting phenotypic programs will require a combination of quantitative modeling and extensive, time-resolved observation of switching events in single cells. In this article, we survey microbial cell fate decisions demonstrated to involve a random element, describe theoretical frameworks for understanding stochastic switching between states, and highlight recent advances in microfluidics that will enable characterization of key dynamic features of these circuits. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Microbiology Volume 69 is October 2015. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates.
Gao T, Foulston L, Chai Y, Wang Q, Losick R. Alternative modes of biofilm formation by plant-associated Bacillus cereus. Microbiologyopen. 2015.Abstract
The ability to form multicellular communities known as biofilms is a widespread adaptive behavior of bacteria. Members of the Bacillus group of bacteria have been found to form biofilms on plant roots, where they protect against pathogens and promote growth. In the case of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis the genetic pathway controlling biofilm formation and the production of an extracellular matrix is relatively well understood. However, it is unclear whether other members of this genus utilize similar mechanisms. We determined that a plant-associated strain of Bacillus cereus (905) can form biofilms by two seemingly independent pathways. In one mode involving the formation of floating biofilms (pellicles) B. cereus 905 appears to rely on orthologs of many of the genes known to be important for B. subtilis biofilm formation. We report that B. cereus 905 also forms submerged, surface-associated biofilms and in a manner that resembles biofilm formation by the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. This alternative mode, which does not rely on B. subtilis-like genes for pellicle formation, takes place under conditions of glucose fermentation and depends on a drop in the pH of the medium.
Leiman SA, Richardson C, Foulston L, Elsholz AKW, First EA, Losick R. Identification and Characterization of Mutations Conferring Resistance to d-amino acids in Bacillus subtilis. J Bacteriol. 2015.Abstract
Bacteria produce d-amino acids for incorporation into the peptidoglycan and certain nonribosomally produced peptides. However, d-amino acids are toxic if mischarged on tRNAs or misincorporated into protein. Common strains of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis are particularly sensitive to the growth-inhibitory effects of d-tyrosine due to the absence of d-aminoacyl tRNA deacylase, an enzyme that prevents misincorporation of d-tyrosine and other d-amino acids into nascent proteins. We isolated spontaneous mutants of B. subtilis that survive in the presence of a mixture of d-leucine, d-methionine, d-tryptophan, and d-tyrosine. Whole genome sequencing revealed that these strains harbored mutations affecting tRNA(Tyr) charging. Three of the most potent mutations enhanced the expression of the gene (tyrS) for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. In particular, resistance was conferred by mutations that destabilized the terminator hairpin of the tyrS riboswitch, as well as by a mutation that transformed a tRNA(Phe) into a tyrS riboswitch ligand. The most potent mutation, a substitution near the tyrosine-recognition site of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, improved enzyme stereoselectivity. We conclude that these mutations promote the proper charging of tRNA(Tyr), thus facilitating the exclusion of d-tyrosine from protein biosynthesis in cells that lack d-aminoacyl tRNA deacylase. IMPORTANCE: Proteins are composed of l-amino acids. Mischarging of tRNAs with d-amino acids or the misincorporation of d-amino acids into proteins causes toxicity. This work reports on mutations that confer resistance to d-amino acids and their mechanisms of action.
Losick R. A love affair with Bacillus subtilis. J Biol Chem. 2015;290 (5) :2529-38.Abstract
My career in science was launched when I was an undergraduate at Princeton University and reinforced by graduate training at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. However, it was only after I moved to Harvard University as a junior fellow that my affections were captured by a seemingly mundane soil bacterium. What Bacillus subtilis offered was endless fascinating biological problems (alternative sigma factors, sporulation, swarming, biofilm formation, stochastic cell fate switching) embedded in a uniquely powerful genetic system. Along the way, my career in science became inseparably interwoven with teaching and mentoring, which proved to be as rewarding as the thrill of discovery.
2014
Romero D, Vlamakis H, Losick R, Kolter R. Functional analysis of the accessory protein TapA in Bacillus subtilis amyloid fiber assembly. J Bacteriol. 2014;196 (8) :1505-13.Abstract
Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation relies on the assembly of a fibrous scaffold formed by the protein TasA. TasA polymerizes into highly stable fibers with biochemical and morphological features of functional amyloids. Previously, we showed that assembly of TasA fibers requires the auxiliary protein TapA. In this study, we investigated the roles of TapA sequences from the C-terminal and N-terminal ends and TapA cysteine residues in its ability to promote the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers. We found that the cysteine residues are not essential for the formation of TasA fibers, as their replacement by alanine residues resulted in only minor defects in biofilm formation. Mutating sequences in the C-terminal half had no effect on biofilm formation. However, we identified a sequence of 8 amino acids in the N terminus that is key for TasA fiber formation. Strains expressing TapA lacking these 8 residues were completely defective in biofilm formation. In addition, this TapA mutant protein exhibited a dominant negative effect on TasA fiber formation. Even in the presence of wild-type TapA, the mutant protein inhibited fiber assembly in vitro and delayed biofilm formation in vivo. We propose that this 8-residue sequence is crucial for the formation of amyloid-like fibers on the cell surface, perhaps by mediating the interaction between TapA or TapA and TasA molecules.
Foulston L, Elsholz AKW, DeFrancesco AS, Losick R. The extracellular matrix of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms comprises cytoplasmic proteins that associate with the cell surface in response to decreasing pH. MBio. 2014;5 (5) :e01667-14.Abstract

UNLABELLED: Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus involves the formation of an extracellular matrix, but the composition of this matrix has been uncertain. Here we report that the matrix is largely composed of cytoplasmic proteins that reversibly associate with the cell surface in a manner that depends on pH. We propose a model for biofilm formation in which cytoplasmic proteins are released from cells in stationary phase. These proteins associate with the cell surface in response to decreasing pH during biofilm formation. Rather than utilizing a dedicated matrix protein, S. aureus appears to recycle cytoplasmic proteins that moonlight as components of the extracellular matrix. IMPORTANCE: Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of multiantibiotic-resistant nosocomial infections and is often found growing as a biofilm in catheters and chronic wounds. Biofilm formation is an important pathogenicity strategy that enhances resistance to antimicrobials, thereby limiting treatment options and ultimately contributing to increased morbidity and mortality. Cells in a biofilm are held together by an extracellular matrix that consists in whole or in part of protein, but the nature of the proteins in the S. aureus matrix is not well understood. Here we postulate that S. aureus recycles proteins from the cytoplasm to form the extracellular matrix. This strategy, of cytoplasmic proteins moonlighting as matrix proteins, could allow enhanced flexibility and adaptability for S. aureus in forming biofilms under infection conditions and could promote the formation of mixed-species biofilms in chronic wounds.

Elsholz AKW, Wacker SA, Losick R. Self-regulation of exopolysaccharide production in Bacillus subtilis by a tyrosine kinase. Genes Dev. 2014;28 (15) :1710-20.Abstract
We report that the Bacillus subtilis exopolysaccharide (EPS) is a signaling molecule that controls its own production. EPS synthesis depends on a tyrosine kinase that consists of a membrane component (EpsA) and a kinase component (EpsB). EPS interacts with the extracellular domain of EpsA, which is a receptor, to control kinase activity. In the absence of EPS, the kinase is inactivated by autophosphorylation. The presence of EPS inhibits autophosphorylation and instead promotes the phosphorylation of a glycosyltransferase in the biosynthetic pathway, thereby stimulating the production of EPS. Thus, EPS production is subject to a positive feedback loop that ties its synthesis to its own concentration. Tyrosine kinase-mediated self-regulation could be a widespread feature of the control of exopolysaccharide production in bacteria.
Tucker AT, Bobay BG, Banse AV, Olson AL, Soderblom EJ, Moseley AM, Thompson RJ, Varney KM, Losick R, Cavanagh J. A DNA mimic: the structure and mechanism of action for the anti-repressor protein AbbA. J Mol Biol. 2014;426 (9) :1911-24.Abstract
Bacteria respond to adverse environmental conditions by switching on the expression of large numbers of genes that enable them to adapt to unfavorable circumstances. In Bacillus subtilis, many adaptive genes are under the negative control of the global transition state regulator, the repressor protein AbrB. Stressful conditions lead to the de-repression of genes under AbrB control. Contributing to this de-repression is AbbA, an anti-repressor that binds to and blocks AbrB from binding to DNA. Here, we have determined the NMR structure of the functional AbbA dimer, confirmed that it binds to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain of AbrB, and have provided an initial description for the interaction using computational docking procedures. Interestingly, we show that AbbA has structural and surface characteristics that closely mimic the DNA phosphate backbone, enabling it to readily carry out its physiological function.

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