Sarah Surrain, Ed.M., is a Ph.D. student in Education at Harvard University.  She studies the early language and literacy development of children from diverse linguistic backgrounds.  She is particularly interested in how language environments at home and at school influence oral language development during early childhood.  Current projects include a study looking at parents’ perceptions of bilingualism and an investigation of how bilingual language environments influence language development during the transition from home to center-based care in early childhood.  Previously, she was a curriculum developer and literacy coach in Spanish-English bilingual classrooms in Chicago and taught Spanish as a foreign language in PK-12 settings.

 

Download Sarah's curriculum vitae.

Recent Presentations

Parents’ Perceptions of Bilingualism: The Role of Language Experience and Local Language Diversity, at American Educational Research Association, New York, NY, Monday, April 16, 2018
Against a backdrop of growing linguistic diversity and a burgeoning awareness of the benefits of bilingualism, attitudes towards non-English languages in the US have become increasingly polarized (Schildkraut, 2005). Building on research exploring parents’ views of heritage language maintenance (e.g. Velázquez, 2009) and teachers’ beliefs about language diversity (e.g. Byrnes & Kiger, 1994), the current study measured perceptions of the value of bilingualism among 422 adults via an online survey... Read more about Parents’ Perceptions of Bilingualism: The Role of Language Experience and Local Language Diversity
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