Publications by Type: Book Chapter

2020
Schechner, Sara J.Boston Electric: Science by ‘Mail Order’ and Bricolage at Colonial Harvard.” In The Oxford Handbook of History and Material Culture, edited by Ivan Gaskell and Sarah Anne Carter, 170-199. New York: Oxford University Press, 2020.Abstract

With a focus on the experimental apparatus employed and the sociable exchange of ideas, this chapter examines how electricity was taught to Harvard students and members of polite society in the Boston area over the course of the century. Without local instrument makers or suppliers of glass and brass parts, colonial American experimenters had to import equipment and repair parts from London. When time and money discouraged imports, they became bricoleurs, incorporating recycled, traded, and ready-to-hand materials into their apparatus. Benjamin Franklin was an important intermediary in getting scientific instruments from London to Boston and Cambridge, and he shared instructional know-how so that locals could assemble their own Leyden jars and other electrical instruments.

2019
Schechner, Sara J.Introduction.” In From Celestial to Terrestrial Timekeeping: Clock Making in the Bond Family, by Donald Saff, xii-xiii. London: Antiquarian Horological Society, 2019.
2017
Schechner, Sara J.These Are Not Your Mother’s Sundials: Or, Time and Astronomy’s Authority.” In The Science of Time 2016: Time in Astronomy & Society, Past, Present and Future, edited by Pavol Gabor Catherine Hohenkerk Kenneth Seidelmann and Elisa Arias, Ludwig Combrinck, 49-73. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2017. schechner_978-3-319-59909-0_8.pdf
2016
Schechner, Sara J.European Pocket Sundials for Colonial Use in American Territories.” In How Scientific Instruments Have Changed Hands, Scientific Instruments and Collections, 5:119-170. Leiden: Brill, 2016. schechner_07_how_instruments_have_changed_hands.pdf schechner_07_color_plates.pdf
2015
Schechner, Sara J.Instrumentation.” In A Companion to the History of American Science, edited by Georgina M. Montgomery and Mark A. Largent, 408-419. Chichester: Wiley Blackwell, 2015. Wiley Blackwell instrumentation_schechner_companion_to_history_of_am_sci.pdf
2014
Schechner, Sara J. “Webster Memories.” In Rod aand Madge Webster: A Legacy of Collections, Philanthropy, and Friendship, 62-67. Chicago: Adler Planetarium, 2014.
Schechner, Sara J.How Telescopes Came to New England, 1620-1740.” In Scientific Instruments in the History of Science: Studies in Transfer, Use and Preservation, 69-78. Rio de Janeiro: Museu de Astronomia e Ciências Afins (M.A.S.T.), 2014. Full book online schechner_how_telsecopes_came_to_new_england_2014_p69-78.pdf
2011
Stork, David G, Jacob Collins, Marco Duarte, Yasuo Furuichi, Dave Kale, Ashutosh Kulkarni, Dirk M Robinson, Sara J Schechner, Christopher W Tyler, and Nicholas C Williams. “Did Early Renaissance Painters Trace Optically Projected Images? The Conclusion of Independent Scientists, Art Historians, and Artists.” In Digital Imaging for Cultural Heritage Preservation: Analysis, Restoration, and Reconstruction of Ancient Artworks , 215-242. Boca Raton: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, 2011. Barnes & Noble proof copy of text
2008
Schechner, Sara J. “New Worlds, New Scientific Instruments: Cosmology, Mathematics, and Power at the Time of Jamestown.” In The World of 1607, 229-239. Williamsburg: Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, 2008.
Schechner, Sara J.Astrolabes and Medieval Travel.” In The Art, Science, and Technology of Medieval Travel, 181-210. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2008. astrolabes_and_medieval_travel_2008_schechner.pdf
2006
Schechner, Sara J. “The Adventures of Captain John Smith, Pocahontas, and a Sundial.” In East and West: The Common European Heritage, Book of Abstracts of the XXV Scientific Instrument Symposium. Krakow, Poland: Jagiellonian University Museum, 2006.
2005
Schechner, Sara J. “Museum Education and Instruction on the History and Nature of Science.” In Partners in Innovation: Science Education and the Science Workforce, 78-94. Philadelphia: Chemical Heritage Press, 2005.
2004
Schechner, Sara J. “Against the Hockney-Falco thesis: Glass and metal mirrors of the 15th century could not project undistorted images.” In Technical Digest: Frontiers in Optics 2004. Vol. 88th OSA Annual Meeting. Washington, DC: Optical Society of America, 2004.
2002
Schechner, Sara J. “Ancient Cosmologies.” In Beyond Earth: Mapping the Universe, 12-29. Washington, DC: National Geographic, 2002.
2001
Schechner, Sara J. “Sciences in America: Colonial Period to 1789.” In The History of Science in the United States: An Encyclopedia. New York: Garland, 2001.
Schechner, Sara J. “Boston Philosophical Society (1683).” In The History of Science in the United States: An Encyclopedia. New York: Garland, 2001.
Schechner, Sara J. “Almanacs.” In The History of Science in the United States: An Encyclopedia. New York: Garland, 2001.
Schechner, Sara J. “The Time of Day: Marking the Sun’s Passing.” In The Discovery of Time, 120-139. London: MQ Publications, 2001.
2000
Schechner, Sara J. “Comets and Meteors.” In The History of Science and Religion in the Western Tradition: An Encyclopedia. New York: Garland, 2000.
1999
Schechner, Sara J. “West, Benjamin.” In American National Biography. Cary, NC: Oxford University Press, 1999.

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