Motion-robust sub-millimeter isotropic diffusion imaging through motion corrected generalized slice dithered enhanced resolution (MC-gSlider) acquisition

Citation:

Fuyixue Wang, Berkin Bilgic, Zijing Dong, Mary Kate Manhard, Ned Ohringer, Bo Zhao, Melissa Haskell, Stephen F Cauley, Qiuyun Fan, Thomas Witzel, Elfar Adalsteinsson, Lawrence L Wald, and Kawin Setsompop. 2018. “Motion-robust sub-millimeter isotropic diffusion imaging through motion corrected generalized slice dithered enhanced resolution (MC-gSlider) acquisition.” Magn Reson Med, 80, 5, Pp. 1891-1906.

Abstract:

PURPOSE: To develop an efficient MR technique for ultra-high resolution diffusion MRI (dMRI) in the presence of motion. METHODS: gSlider is an SNR-efficient high-resolution dMRI acquisition technique. However, subject motion is inevitable during a prolonged scan for high spatial resolution, leading to potential image artifacts and blurring. In this study, an integrated technique termed Motion Corrected gSlider (MC-gSlider) is proposed to obtain high-quality, high-resolution dMRI in the presence of large in-plane and through-plane motion. A motion-aware reconstruction with spatially adaptive regularization is developed to optimize the conditioning of the image reconstruction under difficult through-plane motion cases. In addition, an approach for intra-volume motion estimation and correction is proposed to achieve motion correction at high temporal resolution. RESULTS: Theoretical SNR and resolution analysis validated the efficiency of MC-gSlider with regularization, and aided in selection of reconstruction parameters. Simulations and in vivo experiments further demonstrated the ability of MC-gSlider to mitigate motion artifacts and recover detailed brain structures for dMRI at 860 μm isotropic resolution in the presence of motion with various ranges. CONCLUSION: MC-gSlider provides motion-robust, high-resolution dMRI with a temporal motion correction sensitivity of 2 s, allowing for the recovery of fine detailed brain structures in the presence of large subject movements.