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    Gennaioli, Nicola, Rafael LaPorta, Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes, and Andrei Shleifer. 2014. “Growth in Regions.” Journal of Economic Growth 19 (3): 259-309. Publisher's Version Abstract

    We use a newly assembled sample of 1,528 regions from 83 countries to compare the speed of per capita income convergence within and across countries.  Regional growth is shaped by similar factors as national growth, such as geography and human capital.  Regional convergence rate is about 2% per year, comparable to that between countries.   Regional convergence is faster in richer countries, and countries with better capital markets.  A calibration of a neoclassical growth model suggests that significant barriers to factor mobility within countries are needed to account for the evidence. 

    Gennaioli, Nicola, Andrei Shleifer, and Robert Vishny. 2014. “Finance and the Preservation of Wealth.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 129 (3): 1221-1254. Publisher's Version Abstract

    We introduce the model of asset management developed in Gennaioli, Shleifer, and Vishny (GSV, 2014) into a Solow-style neoclassical growth model with diminishing returns to capital. Savers rely on trusted intermediaries to manage their wealth (claims on capital stock), who can charge fees above costs to trusting investors. In this model, the ratio of financial income to GDP increases with the ratio of aggregate wealth to GDP. Both rise along the convergence path to steady state growth. We examine several further implications of the model for management fees, unit costs of finance, and the consequences of shocks to trust and to the capital stock.

    Barberis, Nicholas, Robin Greenwood, Lawrence Jin, and Andrei Shleifer. 2015. “X-CAPM: An Extrapolative Capital Asset Pricing Model.” Journal of Financial Economics 115 (1): 1-24. Publisher's Version Abstract

    Survey evidence suggests that many investors form beliefs about future stock market returns by extrapolating past returns. Such beliefs are hard to reconcile with existing models of the aggregate stock market. We study a consumption-based asset pricing model in which some investors form beliefs about future price changes in the stock market by extrapolating past price changes, while other investors hold fully rational beliefs. We find that the model captures many features of actual prices and returns; importantly, however, it is also consistent with the survey evidence on investor expectations.

    Greenwood, Robin, and Andrei Shleifer. 2014. “Expectations of Returns and Expected Returns.” Review of Financial Studies 27 (3): 714-746. Abstract

    We analyze time series of investor expectations of future stock market returns from six data sources between 1963 and 2011. The six measures of expectations are highly positively correlated with each other, as well as with past stock returns and with the level of the stock market. However, investor expectations are strongly negatively correlated with model-based expected returns. The evidence is not consistent with rational expectations representative investor models of returns.

    Bordalo, Pedro, Nicola Gennaioli, and Andrei Shleifer. 2015. “Salience Theory of Judicial Decisions.” Journal of Legal Studies 44 (S1): S7-S33. Publisher's Version Abstract

    We present a model of judicial decision making in which the judge overweights the salient facts of the case. The context of the judicial decision, which is comparative by nature, shapes which aspects of the case stand out and draw the judge's attention. By focusing judicial attention on such salient aspects of the case, legally irrelevant information can aect judicial decisions. Our model accounts for a range of recent experimental evidence bearing on the psychology of judicial decisions, including anchoring eects in the setting of damages, decoy eects in choice of legal remedies, and framing eects in the decision to litigate. The model also oers a new approach to positive analysis of damage awards in torts.

    LaPorta, Rafael, and Andrei Shleifer. 2014. “Informality and Development.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 28 (3): 109-126. Publisher's Version Abstract

    We establish five facts about the informal economy in developing countries.  First, it is huge, reaching about half of the total in the poorest countries.   Second, it has extremely low productivity compared to the formal economy: informal firms are typically small, inefficient, and run by poorly educated entrepreneurs.   Third, although avoidance of taxes and regulations is an important reason for informality, the productivity of informal firms is too low for them to thrive in the formal sector.   Lowering registration costs neither brings many informal firms into the formal sector, nor unleashes economic growth.  Fourth, the informal economy is largely disconnected from the formal economy.   Informal firms rarely transition to formality, and continue their existence, often for years or even decades, without much growth or improvement.   Fifth, as countries grow and develop, the informal economy eventually shrinks, and the formal economy comes to dominate economic life.  These five facts are most consistent with dual models of informality and economic development. 

    Glaeser, Edward L, and Andrei Shleifer. 2014. “Gary Becker (1930–2014).” Science 344 (6189): 1233. Publisher's Version Abstract

    Gary Becker, who died on 3 May 2014 at the age of 83, redefined economics both in its methodology and scope. He radically expanded the sphere of economic analysis. As the range of issues and especially data in economics increased over the last half century, Becker's approach became more and more relevant and modern. He was awarded the 1992 Nobel Prize in Economics for “having extended the domain of microeconomic analysis to a wide range of human behavior and interaction, including nonmarket behavior.”

    Rognlie, Matthew, Andrei Shleifer, and Alp Simsek. 2018. “Investment Hangover and the Great Recession.” American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics 10 (2): 113-53. Abstract

    We present a model of investment hangover motivated by the Great Recession. Overbuilding of durable capital such as housing requires a reallocation of productive resources to other sectors, which is facilitated by a reduction in the interest rate. When monetary policy is constrained, overbuilding induces a demand-driven recession with limited reallocation and low output. Investment in other capital initially declines due to low demand, but it later booms and induces an asymmetric recovery in which the overbuilt sector is left behind. Welfare can be improved by expost policies that stimulate investment (including in overbuilt capital), and ex-ante policies that restrict investment.

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