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    Barberis, Nicholas, Andrei Shleifer, and Robert Vishny. 1998. “A Model of Investor Sentiment.” Journal of Financial Economics 49 (3): 307-343. Abstract

    Recent empirical research in finance has uncovered two families of pervasive regularities underreaction of stock prices to news such as earnings announcements, and overreaction of stock prices to a series of good or bad news. In this paper, we present a parsimonious model of investor sentiment, or of how investors form beliefs, which is consistent with the empirical findings. The model is based on psychological evidence and produces both underreaction and overreaction for a wide range of parameter values.

    Gennaioli, Nicola, Andrei Shleifer, and Robert W Vishny. 2013. “A Model of Shadow Banking.” Journal of Finance 68 (4): 1331-1363. Abstract

    We present a model of shadow banking in which banks originate and trade loans, assemble them into diversified portfolios, and finance these portfolios externally with riskless debt. In this model: outside investor wealth drives the demand for riskless debt and indirectly for securitization, bank assets and leverage move together, banks become interconnected through markets, and banks increase their exposure to systematic risk as they reduce idiosyncratic risk through diversification. The shadow banking system is stable and welfare improving under rational expectations, but vulnerable to crises and liquidity dry-ups when investors neglect tail risks.

    Treisman, Daniel, and Andrei Shleifer. 2004. “A Normal Country.” Foreign Affairs 83 (2): 20-38.
    Glaeser, Edward, Wei Huang, Yueran Ma, and Andrei Shleifer. 2017. “A Real Estate Boom with Chinese Characteristics” 31 (1): 93-116. Abstract

    Chinese housing prices rose by over 10 percent per year in real terms between 2003 and 2014, and are now between two and ten times higher than the construction cost of apartments. At the same time, Chinese developers built 100 billion square feet of residential real estate. This boom has been accompanied by a large increase in the number of vacant homes, held by both developers and households. This boom may turn out to be a housing bubble followed by a crash, yet that future is far from certain. The demand for real estate in China is so strong that current prices might be sustainable, especially given the sparse alternative investments for Chinese households, so long as the level of new supply is radically curtailed. Whether that happens depends on the policies of the Chinese government, which must weigh the benefits of price stability against the costs of restricting urban growth.

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