Publications

2021
Accelerating Robot Dynamics Gradients on a CPU, GPU, and FPGA
Brian Plancher, Sabrina M Neuman, Thomas Bourgeat, Scott Kuindersma, Srinivas Devadas, and Vijay Janapa Reddi. 2021. “Accelerating Robot Dynamics Gradients on a CPU, GPU, and FPGA.” IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters (RA-L). Full TextAbstract
Computing the gradient of rigid body dynamics is a central operation in many state-of-the-art planning and control algorithms in robotics. Parallel computing platforms such as GPUs and FPGAs can offer performance gains for algorithms with hardware-compatible computational structures. In this paper, we detail the designs of three faster than state-of-the-art implementations of the gradient of rigid body dynamics on a CPU, GPU, and FPGA. Our optimized FPGA and GPU implementations provide as much as a 3.0x end-to-end speedup over our optimized CPU implementation by refactoring the algorithm to exploit its computational features, e.g., parallelism at different granularities. We also find that the relative performance across hardware platforms depends on the number of parallel gradient evaluations required.
Robomorphic computing: a design methodology for domain-specific accelerators parameterized by robot morphology
Sabrina M Neuman, Brian Plancher, Thomas Bourgeat, Thierry Tambe, Srinivas Devadas, and Vijay Janapa Reddi. 2021. “Robomorphic computing: a design methodology for domain-specific accelerators parameterized by robot morphology.” In Proceedings of the 26th ACM International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems (ASPLOS), Pp. 674–686. Full TextAbstract
Robotics applications have hard time constraints and heavy computational burdens that can greatly benefit from domain-specific hardware accelerators. For the latency-critical problem of robot motion planning and control, there exists a performance gap of at least an order of magnitude between joint actuator response rates and state-of-the-art software solutions. Hardware acceleration can close this gap, but it is essential to define automated hardware design flows to keep the design process agile as applications and robot platforms evolve. To address this challenge, we introduce robomorphic computing: a methodology to transform robot morphology into a customized hardware accelerator morphology. We (i) present this design methodology, using robot topology and structure to exploit parallelism and matrix sparsity patterns in accelerator hardware; (ii) use the methodology to generate a parameterized accelerator design for the gradient of rigid body dynamics, a key kernel in motion planning; (iii) evaluate FPGA and synthesized ASIC implementations of this accelerator for an industrial manipulator robot; and (iv) describe how the design can be automatically customized for other robot models. Our FPGA accelerator achieves speedups of 8x and 86x over CPU and GPU when executing a single dynamics gradient computation. It maintains speedups of 1.9x to 2.9x over CPU and GPU, including computation and I/O round-trip latency, when deployed as a coprocessor to a host CPU for processing multiple dynamics gradient computations. ASIC synthesis indicates an additional 7.2x speedup for single computation latency. We describe how this principled approach generalizes to more complex robot platforms, such as quadrupeds and humanoids, as well as to other computational kernels in robotics, outlining a path forward for future robomorphic computing accelerators.
2019
Benchmarking and workload analysis of robot dynamics algorithms
Sabrina M Neuman, Twan Koolen, Jules Drean, Jason E Miller, and Srinivas Devadas. 2019. “Benchmarking and workload analysis of robot dynamics algorithms.” In 2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Pp. 5235–5242. IEEE. Full TextAbstract
Rigid body dynamics calculations are needed for many tasks in robotics, including online control. While there currently exist several competing software implementations that are sufficient for use in traditional control approaches, emerging sophisticated motion control techniques such as nonlinear model predictive control demand orders of magnitude more frequent dynamics calculations. Current software solutions are not fast enough to meet that demand for complex robots. The goal of this work is to examine the performance of current dynamics software libraries in detail. In this paper, we (i) survey current state-of-the-art software implementations of the key rigid body dynamics algorithms (RBDL, Pinocchio, RigidBodyDynamics.jl, and RobCoGen), (ii) establish a methodology for benchmarking these algorithms, and (iii) characterize their performance through real measurements taken on a modern hardware platform. With this analysis, we aim to provide direction for future improvements that will need to be made to enable emerging techniques for real-time robot motion control. To this end, we are also releasing our suite of benchmarks to enable others to help contribute to this important task.
2017
Sabrina M Neuman, Jason E Miller, Daniel Sanchez, and Srinivas Devadas. 2017. “Using application-level thread progress information to manage power and performance.” In 2017 IEEE International Conference on Computer Design (ICCD), Pp. 501–508. IEEE. Full TextAbstract
Power and thermal limitations make it impossible to run all cores on a multicore system at their maximum frequency. Therefore, modern systems require careful power management. These systems must manage complex tradeoffs between energy, power, and frequency, choosing which cores to accelerate to achieve good performance while maintaining energy efficiency or operating under a power budget. Navigating these tradeoffs is especially hard with multi-threaded applications, where performance depends on the relative progress of parallel worker threads between synchronization points. Prior work on chip-level power management for multi-threaded applications has largely relied on indirect heuristics and metrics calculated from low-level performance counters to estimate each thread’s progress. However, these indirect metrics are often inaccurate. Instead, we propose to gather progress information directly from software itself. We present ThreadBeats, a simple application-level annotation framework that directly and accurately conveys thread progress information to hardware. We design DVFS controllers that exploit ThreadBeats information for two purposes: (i) improving performance by equalizing thread progress and (ii) minimizing runtime under a power budget constraint. These controllers reduce wait time at barriers by 77% on average and improve energy-delay product under a power budget by 23% over prior work.
2014
Power modeling and other new features in the graphite simulator
George Kurian, Sabrina M Neuman, George Bezerra, Anthony Giovinazzo, Srinivas Devadas, and Jason E Miller. 2014. “Power modeling and other new features in the graphite simulator.” In 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Performance Analysis of Systems and Software (ISPASS), Pp. 132–134. IEEE. Full TextAbstract
This paper described recent improvements to the Graphite simulator designed to help explore current and emerging research topics. With these improvements, Graphite is ideally suited to explore both power and performance in future multicore and manycore processors, especially those incorporating dynamic runtime monitoring and adaptation. Separate validation of Graphite has shown performance results within about 6% on average (18% worst case) of a cycle-level simulator and normalized power trends are predicted to within 10%. This makes Graphite accurate enough for medium- to long-term studies while maintaining very high performance. Graphite is freely available for anyone to use: https://github.com/mit-carbon/Graphite.
A self-aware processor SoC using energy monitors integrated into power converters for self-adaptation
Yildiz Sinangil, Sabrina M Neuman, Mahmut E Sinangil, Nathan Ickes, George Bezerra, Eric Lau, Jason E Miller, Henry C Hoffmann, Srini Devadas, and Anantha P Chandraksan. 2014. “A self-aware processor SoC using energy monitors integrated into power converters for self-adaptation.” In 2014 Symposium on VLSI Circuits Digest of Technical Papers, Pp. 1–2. IEEE. Full TextAbstract
This paper presents a self-aware processor with energy monitoring circuits that can measure actual energy consumption of the key blocks. The monitors are embedded into on-chip DC/DC converters and generate results within 10% of accuracy with minimal power (<0.1%) and area (<1%) overhead. Our system, which is implemented in 0.18um technology, is designed to be voltage scalable from 1.8V down to 0.6V. Low-voltage SRAM operation is made possible through the use of 8T bit-cells and write-assists. The d-caches are designed to be re-configurable in associativity and size to adapt to compute- versus cache-bound phases of applications. Cache configuration is performed in < 3 clock cycles including tag invalidation. These hardware features enable a software self-aware computation engine (SEEC) to dynamically adapt the processor to meet performance and energy goals. Measurement results show that up to 8.4x energy savings can be achieved with DVFS and self-adaptation.
2012
Self-aware computing in the Angstrom processor
Henry Hoffmann, Jim Holt, George Kurian, Eric Lau, Martina Maggio, Jason E Miller, Sabrina M Neuman, Mahmut Sinangil, Yildiz Sinangil, Anant Agarwal, Anantha P Chandrakasan, and Srinivas Devadas. 2012. “Self-aware computing in the Angstrom processor.” In Proceedings of the 49th Annual Design Automation Conference (DAC), Pp. 259–264. Full TextAbstract
Addressing the challenges of extreme scale computing requires holistic design of new programming models and systems that support those models. This paper discusses the Angstrom processor, which is designed to support a new Self-aware Computing (SEEC) model. In SEEC, applications explicitly state goals, while other systems components provide actions that the SEEC runtime system can use to meet those goals. Angstrom supports this model by exposing sensors and adaptations that traditionally would be managed independently by hardware. This exposure allows SEEC to coordinate hardware actions with actions specified by other parts of the system, and allows the SEEC runtime system to meet application goals while reducing costs (e.g., power consumption).
2010
Zachary Remscrim, James Paris, Steven B Leeb, Steven R Shaw, Sabrina Neuman, Christopher Schantz, Sean Muller, and Sarah Page. 2010. “FPGA-based spectral envelope preprocessor for power monitoring and control.” In 2010 Twenty-Fifth Annual IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition (APEC), Pp. 2194–2201. IEEE. Full TextAbstract
Smart Grid and Smart Meter initiatives seek to enable energy providers and consumers to intelligently manage their energy needs through real-time monitoring, analysis, and control. We have developed an inexpensive FPGA implementation of a spectral envelope preprocessor. This FPGA permits cost-effective and richly detailed power consumption monitoring for individual loads or collections of loads. It permits a flexible trade-off between data transmission, storage, and computation requirements in a power monitoring or control system. The information from the FPGA can be used to coordinate the operation of power electronic controls.