Sex disparities in COVID-19 mortality vary considerably across time: The case of New York State

Citation:

Danielsen, Ann Caroline, Marion MN Boulicault, Annika Gompers, Tamara Rushovich, Katharine Mn Lee, and Sarah S. Richardson. “Sex disparities in COVID-19 mortality vary considerably across time: The case of New York State.” medRxiv (2022). Copy at https://tinyurl.com/ycr5lhg4

Abstract:

This article shows that in NY the magnitude of sex disparities in COVID-19 mortality was not stable across time. While the initial surge in COVID-19 mortality was characterized by stark sex disparities, these were greatly attenuated after the introduction of public health controls. As of August 28, 2021, 19 227 (44.2%) women and 24 295 (55.8%) men died from COVID-19 in NY. 72.7% of the cumulative difference in the number of COVID-19 deaths between women and men was accrued between March 14 and May 4, 2020. During this period, the COVID-19 mortality rate ratio for men compared to women was 1.56 (95% CI: 1.52-1.61). In subsequent time periods, the corresponding ratio ranged between 1.08 (0.98-1.18) and 1.24 (1.15-1.34). While the cumulative mortality rate ratio of men compared to women was 1.34 (1.31-1.37), the ratio equals 1.19 (1.16-1.22) if deaths during the initial COVID-19 surge are excluded from the analysis.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 01/12/2022