When private equity firms invest in women’s health clinics, who benefits?

Citation:

Borsa, Alexander, Joseph Bruch, and Sarah S. Richardson. “When private equity firms invest in women’s health clinics, who benefits? .” STAT, 2020, Sep. 14. Copy at https://j.mp/3lT1ivE

Abstract:

The increasing influence of private equity in a range of health care delivery settings such as physician staffingnursing homes, and hospitals is not new. But our research reveals a precipitous rise of private equity activity in women’s health. The recent rise of private equity in this area marks a novel form of investor attention with unknown implications. To determine how the incentives of private equity firms interact with clinicians’ mission of caring for women, policymakers, researchers, and the general public need to stay vigilant. Deals between private equity firms and health care providers should be transparent, and ethical standards should be put in place to ensure that profits don’t get in the way of people, and that patients are able to access comprehensive, equitable, and affordable care.

Publisher's Version