Trygve Throntveit

Curriculum Vitae

DR. TRYGVE V. R. THRONTVEIT
Harvard University Department of History
201 Robinson Hall, Cambridge MA 03138
Cell/Office: (617) 230-1422/495-9147
Email: throntv@fas.harvard.edu                                                                                                                                                      

EDUCATION

Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), 2004-2008
Ph.D., History, June, 2008. American intellectual history, political history, and international relations.

Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), 2002-2004
A.M., History, May, 2004. Study under James T. Kloppenberg, Akira Iriye, Joyce E. Chaplin, and Mark Kishlansky.

Harvard College (Cambridge, MA), 1997-2001
A.B., History and Literature, magna cum laude, June 2001. Detur Scholar, Ralph Waldo Emerson Award, Phi Beta Kappa. Senior Thesis on the intellectual and personal influence of Henry James, Sr. on the work and thought of William James.

Languages: Spanish (reading, proficient), French (reading, satisfactory), German (reading, satisfactory).


DISSERTATION
“Related States: Pragmatism, Progressivism, and Internationalism in American Thought and Politics, 1880-1920,”
supervised by Professors James T. Kloppenberg, Akira Iriye, and Erez Manela.


RESEARCH and PUBLICATIONS

Power without Victory: Woodrow Wilson and the American Internationalist Experiment, under contract with the University of Chicago Press.

William James’s Ethical Republic: A Moral and Political Study, under contract with Palgrave Macmillan.

“The Fourteen Points,” in Timothy J. Lynch, ed. The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History (New York: Oxford University Press, forthcoming).

“The Higher Education of Woodrow Wilson,” in James Axtell, ed., The Educational Legacy of Woodrow Wilson: From College to Nation (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012).

“The Audacity of Pragmatism: William James, Barack Obama, and the American Deliberative Tradition,” in Miriam Strube, ed., Revisioning William James (Heidelberg: Verlag Winter, forthcoming).

“A Strange Fate: Quincy Wright and the Trans-War Trajectory of Wilsonian Internationalism, 1920-1945,” White House Studies 10.4 (2011), 361-377.

“What was Wilson Thinking? A Review of the Literature on Wilson and World Politics,” White House Studies 10.4 (2011), 460-474.

“The Fable of the Fourteen Points: Woodrow Wilson and National Self-Determination,” Diplomatic History 35 (June 2011), 445-481.

“William James’s Ethical Republic,” Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (April 2011), 255-276.

“Woodrow Wilson, Past and Present,” Democracy: A Journal of Ideas (Spring 2010), 99-106.

“The Will to Behold: Thorstein Veblen’s Pragmatic Aesthetics,” Modern Intellectual History 5 (November 2008), 519-546.

“‘Common Counsel’: Woodrow Wilson’s Pragmatic Progressivism, 1885-1913,” in John M. Cooper, Jr., ed., Reconsidering Woodrow Wilson: Progressivism, Internationalism, War, and Peace (Washington, DC and Baltimore: The Wilson Center Press/Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008), 25-56.

“Numbered Among the Jameses: The Ralph Waldo Emerson Centenary Address,” Streams of William James: A Newsletter of the William James Society 5.3 (2003).

 
PAPERS and PRESENTATIONS

“Unfated Ironies: Wilson’s Aberrant Racism and Imperialism,” paper in progress for the 2012 Southern Historical Association meeting in Mobile, AL, panel on “Wilson and the South,” November 1-4, 2012.

"On a Certain Blindness: The Relevance of Race to Wilson's Political Vision," paper in progress for the 2012 Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations conference in Hartford, CT, panle on "Race, Memory, and Wilsonianism," June 28-30, 2012.

"Quincy Wright and International Relations at Chicago: Toward a Critical and Constructive History of the Field," in progress for the annual workshop of the History of Social Science Group, Ecole normale supérieure de Cachan, France, June 15-16, 2012.

“Philosophical Pragmatism and the Progressive Revolution of 1912,” paper in progress for the 2012 Midwestern Political Science Association meeting in Chicago, IL, panel on “Roots of American Progressivism,” April 12-15, 2012.

“A League for the Layperson: Popular Internationalism and the American Treaty Fight, 1918-1922,” paper for the 2011 Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations conference in Arlington, VA, panel on “The Internationalist Interregnum: Revision the American Narrative from Great War to Great Depression,” June 25, 2011.

“Pragmatism and the Contours of a Progressive Foreign Policy,” workshop at the annual Democratic Renaissance Project meeting in Washington, DC, June 16, 2011.

“The Political Ethics of William James,” paper for the 2011 American Philosophical Association conference (Central Division) in Minneapolis, MN, panel on “Pluralistic Uses of William James,” April 2, 2011.

“A League for the Layperson: Popular Internationalism and the American Treaty Fight, 1918-1922,” paper for the 2011 Organization of American Historians conference in Houston, TX, panel on “Isolationism and Internationalism between the World Wars,” March 19, 2011.

“A League for the Layperson: Public Intellectuals, Presidential Leadership, and Popular Internationalism in the Era of the Treaty Fight, 1918-1922,” paper for the 2010 US Intellectual History conference in New York, NY, panel on “Americans and the World, 1898-1922,” October 22, 2010.

“The Audacity of Pragmatism: William James, Barack Obama, and the American Deliberative Tradition,” delivered at the William James Society’s William James Centenary Symposium, Cambridge, MA and Chocorua, NH, August 13-15, 2010.

“A Strange Fate: Quincy Wright and the Trans-War Trajectory of Wilsonian Internationalism, 1920-1945,” delivered at the 2010 Woodrow Wilson Symposium, Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library, Staunton, VA, March 15-16, 2010.

“The Higher Education of Woodrow Wilson,” delivered at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs for a conference on “The Legacy of Woodrow Wilson in Higher Education,” October 16-17, 2009.

“Related States: Pragmatism, Progressivism, and Internationalism in U.S. Foreign Policy, 1914-1920,” delivered at the 2009 American Historical Association conference in New York, NY, panel on “New Perspectives on the U.S. Role in the World during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era,” January 3, 2009.

“Reviewing Grand Strategies of the Post-Cold War and Post-9/11 Eras,” background paper for a symposium organized in Cambridge, MA by Professor Ernest R. May of Harvard University, May 1, 2007, on behalf of the Bipartisan Policy Institute in Washington, DC.

“‘Common Counsel’: Wilson, Pragmatism, and Progressivism Before the War,” delivered at the Wilson 150 National Symposium, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC, October 27, 2006.

“The Fable of the Fourteen Points: Woodrow Wilson and National Self-Determination,” delivered at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies annual graduate student conference, “Bridging Disciplines, Spanning the World: Approaches to Development, Diversity, and Democracy,” Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, April 7-8, 2006.


AWARDS and FELLOWSHIPS (selected)

Charles Warren Center for American History, Harvard University, Associate Fellow (2011-12)

Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Junior Faculty Research Grant (2011)

Hagley Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society Exploratory
Grant (2011)

American Catholic History Research Center Dorothy Mohler Research Grant (2011)

Huntington Library Haynes Foundation Fellowship (2010-11)

American Jewish Archives Marcus Center Rapoport Fellowship (2010-11)

FM/Harvard Crimson Top Fifteen Young Faculty (2009)

Harvard University Dissertation Completion Fellowship (2008)

Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History Research Grant (2007, 2005)

Harvard Center for American Political Studies (CAPS) Seed Grant (2006)

George C. Marshall Foundation Baruch Fellowship (2006)

Derek Bok Center Certificate of Distinction in Teaching (Spring, Fall Terms 2005)

First Prize, William James Society Annual Essay Contest (2003)

Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Iota of Massachusetts, Harvard College (2001)

TEACHING and ADMINISTRATION

Asst. Director of Undergraduate Studies in History; Harvard University (2009—present)
Appointed to oversee and overhaul the History Department’s undergraduate advising program, senior thesis program, and student outreach initiatives, and to assist in formulating Department-wide curricular goals, structures, and standards. Also teaching one research seminar for advanced undergraduates in the spring. Worked to raise student satisfaction ratings into top three among Humanities and Social Sciences.

Lecturer on History, Harvard University (2008—present)
2010-11 courses
: History 84t, Trans-War America: Origins of an Ambivalent Empire, 1919-1945 (research seminar); History 99, Workshop for Senior Thesis Writers. 2009-10 courses: History 84o, Woodrow Wilson’s America: The Emergence of the Modern United States, 1856-1924 (lecture course); History 99, Workshop for Senior Thesis Writers. 2008-09 courses: History 1461, War and the World of Ideas in America, Civil War to Iraq (lecture); History 74h, Intellectual, Cultural, and Political Origins of U.S. Foreign Relations since 1898 (reading seminar); History 1452, American Politics and Society, Reconstruction to the Present (lecture); History 84j, Pragmatism and Reform in American Social Thought (research seminar).

Tutor, History 90f: International History (Spring 2007)
Taught two weekly two-hour sections of Prof. Ernest R. May’s tutorial for sophomores planning theses in global history, the history of international relations, and/or the history of U.S. foreign policy. (Note: taught three sections of the same course for Prof. Erez Manela in spring 2006.)

Administrative Tutor, History 97: Sophomore Tutorial (Fall 2006)
Coordinated the Harvard History Department’s introductory tutorial, required of all sophomores, comprising ninety-nine students in eighteen four-to-six-student tutorials taught by thirteen tutors. Devised course syllabus; oversaw compilation of three required sourcebooks; facilitated seven teaching workshops for tutors; ran weekly staff meetings; resolved disciplinary and student-performance matters. Also taught one section, running weekly two-hour tutorials, devising sourcebook reading guides and essay assignments, grading student essays in a twenty-four-hour turnaround, and facilitating in-class peer-review conferences. (Note: taught one section of the same course in fall 2004.)

Head Teaching Fellow, History 1661: Social Thought in Modern America (Fall 2005)
Taught two weekly sections of Prof. James T. Kloppenberg’s course on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American political, social, and ethical thought; devised essay assignments and graded student papers; wrote and graded mid-term and final examinations; coordinated sectioning; compiled coursepack; maintained website. (Note: taught two sections of the same course in spring 2005.)

Teaching Fellow, Historical Studies B-27: The English Revolution (Spring 2005)
Taught weekly section of Prof. Mark Kishlansky’s course on Britain, 1603-1696.


PUBLIC HISTORY AND OUTREACH

Founding Editor for History, "Footnote" online research digest (2011- present)
Adviser to Chief Executive Officer, Chief Technical Officer, and Executive Editor of a Boston- and New York-based online “community of inquiry,” designed to disseminate research findings in several disciplines in easily digestible formats; to connect researchers across disciplines to one another and to the interested public; and to expose academic experts to potential consulting, speaking, or publication opportunities. Responsible for content acquisition and contributor recruitment. Also a contributor to the site. Note: Footnote’s initial “soft-launch” and funding drive is slated for March 2012.

Adviser, National-Round Entry of the Rhode Island State Champion History Day Team (2010-11)
Worked with Rhode Island’s State-Champion History Day team on their national-round entry, a documentary on the U.S. debate over membership in the League of Nations during 1919 and 1920. Advised over email and in person, and consented to be interviewed and included in the final film.


SERVICE and SCHOLARLY EXCHANGE

Boston Area Research Workshop on History, Institutions, and Politics (2011—)

Harvard College Standing Committee on Speaking and Writing (2011—)

Harvard College Research Program Application Reviewer (2011)

Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Seminar on History of the Social Sciences (2010)

Harvard Department of History Curriculum Committee (2009—)

Harvard Department of History Board of Examiners (2009—)

Thomas Temple Hoopes Undergraduate Thesis Prize Committee (2008-09; 2010-11)

Non-Resident Tutor in History, Adams House, Harvard College (2007-08)

Assistant Coordinator, Harvard International and Global History Seminar (2006-07)

Non-Resident Tutor in History, Leverett House, Harvard College (2005-08)

Advisor/Reader, Senior Theses in History/Social Studies, Harvard College (2004-12)