Publications

2015
Tokuda J, Plishker W, Torabi M, Olubiyi OI, Zaki G, Tatli S, et al. Graphics Processing Unit-Accelerated Nonrigid Registration of MR Images to CT Images During CT-Guided Percutaneous Liver Tumor Ablations. Acad Radiol. 2015;22 (6) :722-33. Abstract
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid magnetic resonance (MR) to computed tomography (CT) image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. Although both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique on the basis of volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphics processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice similarity coefficient [DSC] and 95% Hausdorff distance [HD]) and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student t test. RESULTS: Accuracies of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively, were 88.3 ± 3.7% versus 89.3 ± 4.9% (P = .41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 versus 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (P = .15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 versus 557 ± 116 seconds (P < .000000002), respectively; there was no significant difference in computation time despite the difference in the complexity of the algorithms (P = .71). CONCLUSIONS: The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique was as accurate as the B-spline technique and required significantly less processing time. The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique may enable the implementation of nonrigid registration into routine clinical practice.
Su H, Shang W, Cole G, Li G, Harrington K, Camilo A, et al. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy. IEEE ASME Trans Mechatron. 2015;20 (4) :1920-1932. Abstract
This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian motion module. The needle driver provides needle cannula translation and rotation (2-DOF) and stylet translation (1-DOF). A custom robot controller consisting of multiple piezoelectric motor drivers provides precision closed-loop control of piezoelectric motors and enables simultaneous robot motion and MR imaging. The developed modular robot control interface software performs image-based registration, kinematics calculation, and exchanges robot commands and coordinates between the navigation software and the robot controller with a new implementation of the open network communication protocol OpenIGTLink. Comprehensive compatibility of the robot is evaluated inside a 3-Tesla MRI scanner using standard imaging sequences and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss is limited to 15%. The image deterioration due to the present and motion of robot demonstrates unobservable image interference. Twenty-five targeted needle placements inside gelatin phantoms utilizing an 18-gauge ceramic needle demonstrated 0.87 mm root mean square (RMS) error in 3D Euclidean distance based on MRI volume segmentation of the image-guided robotic needle placement procedure.
Penzkofer T, Tuncali K, Fedorov A, Song S-E, Tokuda J, Fennessy FM, et al. Transperineal in-bore 3-T MR imaging-guided prostate biopsy: a prospective clinical observational study. Radiology. 2015;274 (1) :170-80. Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the detection rate, clinical relevance, Gleason grade, and location of prostate cancer ( PCa prostate cancer ) diagnosed with and the safety of an in-bore transperineal 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided prostate biopsy in a clinically heterogeneous patient population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective retrospectively analyzed study was HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved, and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-seven men (mean age, 66.2 years ± 6.9) underwent multiparametric endorectal prostate MR imaging at 3 T and transperineal MR imaging-guided biopsy. Three subgroups of patients with at least one lesion suspicious for cancer were included: men with no prior PCa prostate cancer diagnosis, men with PCa prostate cancer who were undergoing active surveillance, and men with treated PCa prostate cancer and suspected recurrence. Exclusion criteria were prior prostatectomy and/or contraindication to 3-T MR imaging. The transperineal MR imaging-guided biopsy was performed in a 70-cm wide-bore 3-T device. Overall patient biopsy outcomes, cancer detection rates, Gleason grade, and location for each subgroup were evaluated and statistically compared by using χ(2) and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc comparisons. RESULTS: Ninety biopsy procedures were performed with no serious adverse events, with a mean of 3.7 targets sampled per gland. Cancer was detected in 51 (56.7%) men: 48.1% (25 of 52) with no prior PCa prostate cancer , 61.5% (eight of 13) under active surveillance, and 72.0% (18 of 25) in whom recurrence was suspected. Gleason pattern 4 or higher was diagnosed in 78.1% (25 of 32) in the no prior PCa prostate cancer and active surveillance groups. Gleason scores were not assigned in the suspected recurrence group. MR targets located in the anterior prostate had the highest cancer yield (40 of 64, 62.5%) compared with those for the other parts of the prostate (P < .001). CONCLUSION: In-bore 3-T transperineal MR imaging-guided biopsy, with a mean of 3.7 targets per gland, allowed detection of many clinically relevant cancers, many of which were located anteriorly.
Tilak G, Tuncali K, Song S-E, Tokuda J, Olubiyi O, Fennessy F, et al. 3T MR-guided in-bore transperineal prostate biopsy: A comparison of robotic and manual needle-guidance templates. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2015;42 (1) :63-71. Abstract
PURPOSE: To demonstrate the utility of a robotic needle-guidance template device as compared to a manual template for in-bore 3T transperineal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided prostate biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This two-arm mixed retrospective-prospective study included 99 cases of targeted transperineal prostate biopsies. The biopsy needles were aimed at suspicious foci noted on multiparametric 3T MRI using manual template (historical control) as compared with a robotic template. The following data were obtained: the accuracy of average and closest needle placement to the focus, histologic yield, percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples, complication rate, and time to complete the procedure. RESULTS: In all, 56 cases were performed using the manual template and 43 cases were performed using the robotic template. The mean accuracy of the best needle placement attempt was higher in the robotic group (2.39 mm) than the manual group (3.71 mm, P < 0.027). The mean core procedure time was shorter in the robotic (90.82 min) than the manual group (100.63 min, P < 0.030). Percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples was higher in the robotic group (P < 0.001). Cancer yields and complication rates were not statistically different between the two subgroups (P = 0.557 and P = 0.172, respectively). CONCLUSION: The robotic needle-guidance template helps accurate placement of biopsy needles in MRI-guided core biopsy of prostate cancer.
Wang W, Viswanathan AN, Damato AL, Chen Y, Tse Z, Pan L, et al. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy. Med Phys. 2015;42 (12) :7114-21. Abstract
PURPOSE: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. METHODS: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter's trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High-resolution 3D MRI of the phantom was performed followed by catheter digitization based on the catheter's imaging artifacts. The catheter trajectory error was characterized in terms of the mean distance between corresponding dwell points in MRTR-generated catheter trajectory and MRI-based catheter digitization. The MRTR-based catheter trajectory reconstruction process was also performed on three gynecologic cancer patients, and then compared with catheter digitization based on MRI and CT. RESULTS: The catheter tip localization error increased as the MRTR stylet moved further off-center and as the stylet's orientation deviated from the main magnetic field direction. Fifteen catheters' trajectories were reconstructed by MRTR. Compared with MRI-based digitization, the mean 3D error of MRTR-generated trajectories was 1.5 ± 0.5 mm with an in-plane error of 0.7 ± 0.2 mm and a tip error of 1.7 ± 0.5 mm. MRTR resolved ambiguity in catheter assignment due to crossed catheter paths, which is a common problem in image-based catheter digitization. In the patient studies, the MRTR-generated catheter trajectory was consistent with digitization based on both MRI and CT. CONCLUSIONS: The MRTR system provides accurate catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction in the MR environment. Relative to the image-based methods, it improves the speed, safety, and reliability of the catheter trajectory reconstruction in interstitial brachytherapy. MRTR may enable in-procedural dosimetric evaluation of implant target coverage.
Tokuda J, Plishker W, Torabi M, Olubiyi OI, Zaki G, Tatli S, et al. Graphics Processing Unit-Accelerated Nonrigid Registration of MR Images to CT Images During CT-Guided Percutaneous Liver Tumor Ablations. Acad Radiol. 2015;22 (6) :722-33. Abstract
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid magnetic resonance (MR) to computed tomography (CT) image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. Although both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique on the basis of volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphics processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice similarity coefficient [DSC] and 95% Hausdorff distance [HD]) and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student t test. RESULTS: Accuracies of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively, were 88.3 ± 3.7% versus 89.3 ± 4.9% (P = .41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 versus 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (P = .15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 versus 557 ± 116 seconds (P < .000000002), respectively; there was no significant difference in computation time despite the difference in the complexity of the algorithms (P = .71). CONCLUSIONS: The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique was as accurate as the B-spline technique and required significantly less processing time. The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique may enable the implementation of nonrigid registration into routine clinical practice.
Tauscher S, Tokuda J, Schreiber G, Neff T, Hata N, Ortmaier T. OpenIGTLink interface for state control and visualisation of a robot for image-guided therapy systems. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2015;10 (3) :285-92. Abstract
PURPOSE: The integration of a robot into an image-guided therapy system is still a time consuming process, due to the lack of a well-accepted standard for interdevice communication. The aim of this project is to simplify this procedure by developing an open interface based on three interface classes: state control, visualisation, and sensor. A state machine on the robot control is added to the concept because the robot has its own workflow during surgical procedures, which differs from the workflow of the surgeon. METHODS: A KUKA Light Weight Robot is integrated into the medical technology environment of the Institute of Mechatronic Systems as a proof of concept. Therefore, 3D Slicer was used as visualisation and state control software. For the network communication the OpenIGTLink protocol was implemented. In order to achieve high rate control of the robot the "KUKA Sunrise. Connectivity SmartServo" package was used. An exemplary state machine providing states typically used by image-guided therapy interventions, was implemented. Two interface classes, which allow for a direct use of OpenIGTLink for robot control on the one hand and visualisation on the other hand were developed. Additionally, a 3D Slicer module was written to operate the state control. RESULTS: Utilising the described software concept the state machine could be operated by the 3D Slicer module with 20 Hz cycle rate and no data loss was detected during a test phase of approximately 270s (13,640 packages). Furthermore, the current robot pose could be sent with more than 60 Hz. No influence on the performance of the state machine by the communication thread could be measured. CONCLUSION: Simplified integration was achieved by using only one programming context for the implementation of the state machine, the interfaces, and the robot control. Eventually, the exemplary state machine can be easily expanded by adding new states.
Su H, Shang W, Cole G, Li G, Harrington K, Camilo A, et al. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy. IEEE ASME Trans Mechatron. 2015;20 (4) :1920-1932. Abstract
This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian motion module. The needle driver provides needle cannula translation and rotation (2-DOF) and stylet translation (1-DOF). A custom robot controller consisting of multiple piezoelectric motor drivers provides precision closed-loop control of piezoelectric motors and enables simultaneous robot motion and MR imaging. The developed modular robot control interface software performs image-based registration, kinematics calculation, and exchanges robot commands and coordinates between the navigation software and the robot controller with a new implementation of the open network communication protocol OpenIGTLink. Comprehensive compatibility of the robot is evaluated inside a 3-Tesla MRI scanner using standard imaging sequences and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss is limited to 15%. The image deterioration due to the present and motion of robot demonstrates unobservable image interference. Twenty-five targeted needle placements inside gelatin phantoms utilizing an 18-gauge ceramic needle demonstrated 0.87 mm root mean square (RMS) error in 3D Euclidean distance based on MRI volume segmentation of the image-guided robotic needle placement procedure.
Wang W, Dumoulin CL, Viswanathan AN, Tse ZTH, Mehrtash A, Loew W, et al. Real-time active MR-tracking of metallic stylets in MR-guided radiation therapy. Magn Reson Med. 2015;73 (5) :1803-11. Abstract
PURPOSE: To develop an active MR-tracking system to guide placement of metallic devices for radiation therapy. METHODS: An actively tracked metallic stylet for brachytherapy was constructed by adding printed-circuit micro-coils to a commercial stylet. The coil design was optimized by electromagnetic simulation, and has a radio-frequency lobe pattern extending ∼5 mm beyond the strong B0 inhomogeneity region near the metal surface. An MR-tracking sequence with phase-field dithering was used to overcome residual effects of B0 and B1 inhomogeneities caused by the metal, as well as from inductive coupling to surrounding metallic stylets. The tracking system was integrated with a graphical workstation for real-time visualization. The 3 Tesla MRI catheter-insertion procedures were tested in phantoms and ex vivo animal tissue, and then performed in three patients during interstitial brachytherapy. RESULTS: The tracking system provided high-resolution (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6 mm(3) ) and rapid (16 to 40 frames per second, with three to one phase-field dithering directions) catheter localization in phantoms, animals, and three gynecologic cancer patients. CONCLUSION: This is the first demonstration of active tracking of the shaft of metallic stylet in MR-guided brachytherapy. It holds the promise of assisting physicians to achieve better targeting and improving outcomes in interstitial brachytherapy.
Penzkofer T, Tuncali K, Fedorov A, Song S-E, Tokuda J, Fennessy FM, et al. Transperineal in-bore 3-T MR imaging-guided prostate biopsy: a prospective clinical observational study. Radiology. 2015;274 (1) :170-80. Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the detection rate, clinical relevance, Gleason grade, and location of prostate cancer ( PCa prostate cancer ) diagnosed with and the safety of an in-bore transperineal 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided prostate biopsy in a clinically heterogeneous patient population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective retrospectively analyzed study was HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved, and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-seven men (mean age, 66.2 years ± 6.9) underwent multiparametric endorectal prostate MR imaging at 3 T and transperineal MR imaging-guided biopsy. Three subgroups of patients with at least one lesion suspicious for cancer were included: men with no prior PCa prostate cancer diagnosis, men with PCa prostate cancer who were undergoing active surveillance, and men with treated PCa prostate cancer and suspected recurrence. Exclusion criteria were prior prostatectomy and/or contraindication to 3-T MR imaging. The transperineal MR imaging-guided biopsy was performed in a 70-cm wide-bore 3-T device. Overall patient biopsy outcomes, cancer detection rates, Gleason grade, and location for each subgroup were evaluated and statistically compared by using χ(2) and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc comparisons. RESULTS: Ninety biopsy procedures were performed with no serious adverse events, with a mean of 3.7 targets sampled per gland. Cancer was detected in 51 (56.7%) men: 48.1% (25 of 52) with no prior PCa prostate cancer , 61.5% (eight of 13) under active surveillance, and 72.0% (18 of 25) in whom recurrence was suspected. Gleason pattern 4 or higher was diagnosed in 78.1% (25 of 32) in the no prior PCa prostate cancer and active surveillance groups. Gleason scores were not assigned in the suspected recurrence group. MR targets located in the anterior prostate had the highest cancer yield (40 of 64, 62.5%) compared with those for the other parts of the prostate (P < .001). CONCLUSION: In-bore 3-T transperineal MR imaging-guided biopsy, with a mean of 3.7 targets per gland, allowed detection of many clinically relevant cancers, many of which were located anteriorly.
2013
Seifabadi R, Cho NBJ, Song S-E, Tokuda J, Hata N, Tempany CM, et al. Accuracy study of a robotic system for MRI-guided prostate needle placement. Int J Med Robot. 2013;9 (3) :305-16. Abstract
BACKGROUND: Accurate needle placement is the first concern in percutaneous MRI-guided prostate interventions. In this phantom study, different sources contributing to the overall needle placement error of a MRI-guided robot for prostate biopsy have been identified, quantified and minimized to the possible extent. METHODS: The overall needle placement error of the system was evaluated in a prostate phantom. This error was broken into two parts: the error associated with the robotic system (called 'before-insertion error') and the error associated with needle-tissue interaction (called 'due-to-insertion error'). Before-insertion error was measured directly in a soft phantom and different sources contributing into this part were identified and quantified. A calibration methodology was developed to minimize the 4-DOF manipulator's error. The due-to-insertion error was indirectly approximated by comparing the overall error and the before-insertion error. The effect of sterilization on the manipulator's accuracy and repeatability was also studied. RESULTS: The average overall system error in the phantom study was 2.5 mm (STD = 1.1 mm). The average robotic system error in the Super Soft plastic phantom was 1.3 mm (STD = 0.7 mm). Assuming orthogonal error components, the needle-tissue interaction error was found to be approximately 2.13 mm, thus making a larger contribution to the overall error. The average susceptibility artifact shift was 0.2 mm. The manipulator's targeting accuracy was 0.71 mm (STD = 0.21 mm) after robot calibration. The robot's repeatability was 0.13 mm. Sterilization had no noticeable influence on the robot's accuracy and repeatability. CONCLUSIONS: The experimental methodology presented in this paper may help researchers to identify, quantify and minimize different sources contributing into the overall needle placement error of an MRI-guided robotic system for prostate needle placement. In the robotic system analysed here, the overall error of the studied system remained within the acceptable range.
Tokuda J, Song S-E, Tuncali K, Tempany C, Hata N. Configurable automatic detection and registration of fiducial frames for device-to-image registration in MRI-guided prostate interventions. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2013;16 (Pt 3) :355-62. Abstract
We propose a novel automatic fiducial frame detection and registration method for device-to-image registration in MRI-guided prostate interventions. The proposed method does not require any manual selection of markers, and can be applied to a variety of fiducial frames, which consist of multiple cylindrical MR-visible markers placed in different orientations. The key idea is that automatic extraction of linear features using a line filter is more robust than that of bright spots by thresholding; by applying a line set registration algorithm to the detected markers, the frame can be registered to the MRI. The method was capable of registering the fiducial frame to the MRI with an accuracy of 1.00 +/- 0.73 mm and 1.41 +/- 1.06 degrees in a phantom study, and was sufficiently robust to detect the fiducial frame in 98% of images acquired in clinical cases despite the existence of anatomical structures in the field of view.
Song S-E, Tokuda J, Tuncali K, Tempany CM, Zhang E, Hata N. Development and preliminary evaluation of a motorized needle guide template for MRI-guided targeted prostate biopsy. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng. 2013;60 (11) :3019-27. Abstract
To overcome the problems of limited needle insertion accuracy and human error in the use of a conventional needle guide template in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided prostate intervention, we developed a motorized MRI-compatible needle guide template that resembles a transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate template. The motorized template allows automated, gapless needle guidance in a 3T MRI scanner with minimal changes in the current clinical procedure. To evaluate the impact of the motorized template on MRI, signal-to-noise ratio and distortion were measured under various system configurations. A maximum of 44% signal-to-noise ratio decrease was found when the ultrasonic motors were running, and a maximum of 0.4% image distortion was observed due to the presence of the motorized template. To measure needle insertion accuracy, we performed four sets of five random target needle insertions mimicking four biopsy procedures, which resulted in an average in-plane targeting error of 0.94 mm with a standard deviation of 0.34 mm. The evaluation studies indicated that the presence and operation of the motorized template in the MRI bore create insignificant image degradation, and provide submillimeter targeting accuracy. The automated needle guide that is directly controlled by navigation software eliminates human error so that the safety of the procedure can be improved.
Li G, Su H, Shang W, Tokuda J, Hata N, Tempany CM, et al. A Fully Actuated Robotic Assistant for MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy and Brachytherapy. Proc SPIE Int Soc Opt Eng. 2013;8671 :867117. Abstract
Intra-operative medical imaging enables incorporation of human experience and intelligence in a controlled, closed-loop fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal modality for surgical guidance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with its ability to perform high resolution, real-time, high soft tissue contrast imaging without ionizing radiation. However, for most current image-guided approaches only static pre-operative images are accessible for guidance, which are unable to provide updated information during a surgical procedure. The high magnetic field, electrical interference, and limited access of closed-bore MRI render great challenges to developing robotic systems that can perform inside a diagnostic high-field MRI while obtaining interactively updated MR images. To overcome these limitations, we are developing a piezoelectrically actuated robotic assistant for actuated percutaneous prostate interventions under real-time MRI guidance. Utilizing a modular design, the system enables coherent and straight forward workflow for various percutaneous interventions, including prostate biopsy sampling and brachytherapy seed placement, using various needle driver configurations. The unified workflow compromises: 1) system hardware and software initialization, 2) fiducial frame registration, 3) target selection and motion planning, 4) moving to the target and performing the intervention (e.g. taking a biopsy sample) under live imaging, and 5) visualization and verification. Phantom experiments of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy were executed under MRI-guidance to evaluate the feasibility of the workflow. The robot successfully performed fully actuated biopsy sampling and delivery of simulated brachytherapy seeds under live MR imaging, as well as precise delivery of a prostate brachytherapy seed distribution with an RMS accuracy of 0.98mm.
Eslami S, Fischer GS, Song S-E, Tokuda J, Hata N, Tempany CM, et al. Towards Clinically Optimized MRI-guided Surgical Manipulator for Minimally Invasive Prostate Percutaneous Interventions: Constructive Design. IEEE Int Conf Robot Autom. 2013;20132 :1228-1233. Abstract
This paper undertakes the modular design and development of a minimally invasive surgical manipulator for MRI-guided transperineal prostate interventions. Severe constraints for the MRI-compatibility to hold the minimum artifact on the image quality and dimensions restraint of the bore scanner shadow the design procedure. Regarding the constructive design, the manipulator kinematics has been optimized and the effective analytical needle workspace is developed and followed by proposing the workflow for the manual needle insertion. A study of the finite element analysis is established and utilized to improve the mechanism weaknesses under some inevitable external forces to ensure the minimum structure deformation. The procedure for attaching a sterile plastic drape on the robot manipulator is discussed. The introduced robotic manipulator herein is aimed for the clinically prostate biopsy and brachytherapy applications.
Song S-E, Hata N, Iordachita I, Fichtinger G, Tempany C, Tokuda J. A workspace-orientated needle-guiding robot for 3T MRI-guided transperineal prostate intervention: evaluation of in-bore workspace and MRI compatibility. Int J Med Robot. 2013;9 (1) :67-74. Abstract
BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided prostate interventions have been introduced to enhance the cancer detection. For accurate needle positioning, in-bore-operated robotic systems have been developed and optimal use of the confined in-bore space become a critical engineering challenge. METHODS: As preliminary evaluation of our prostate intervention robot, we conducted a workspace design analysis, using a new evaluation method that we developed for in-bore-operated robots for transperineal prostate interventions, and an MRI compatibility study. RESULTS: The workspace analysis resulted in the effective workspace (VW ) of 0.32, which is greater than that of our early prototype, despite the current robot being ca. 50% larger than the early prototype in sectional space. The MRI compatibility study resulted in < 15% signal:noise ratio (SNR) reduction. CONCLUSIONS: The new workspace evaluation method quantifies the workspace utilization of the in-bore-operated robots for MRI-guided transperineal prostate interventions, providing a useful tool for evaluation and new robot design. The robot creates insignificant electromagnetic noise during typical prostate imaging sequences.
2012
Mamata H, Tokuda J, Gill RR, Padera RF, Lenkinski RE, Sugarbaker DJ, et al. Clinical application of pharmacokinetic analysis as a biomarker of solitary pulmonary nodules: dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Magn Reson Med. 2012;68 (5) :1614-22. Abstract
The purpose of this study is to evaluate perfusion indices and pharmacokinetic parameters in solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Thirty patients of 34 enrolled with SPNs (15-30 mm) were evaluated in this study. T1 and T2-weighted structural images and 2D turbo FLASH perfusion images were acquired with shallow free breathing. B-spline nonrigid image registration and optimization by χ² test against pharmacokinetic model curve were performed on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. This allowed voxel-by-voxel calculation of k(ep) , the rate constant for tracer transport to and from plasma and the extravascular extracellular space. Mean transit time, time-to-peak, initial slope, and maximum enhancement (E(max) ) were calculated from time-intensity curves fitted to a gamma variate function. After blinded data analysis, correlation with tissue histology from surgical resection or biopsy samples was performed. Histologic evaluation revealed 25 malignant and five benign SPNs. All benign SPNs had k(ep) < 1.0 min⁻¹. Nineteen of 25 (76%) malignant SPNs showed k(ep) > 1.0 min⁻¹. Sensitivity to diagnose malignant SPNs at a cutoff of k(ep) = 1.0 min⁻¹ was 76%, specificity was 100%, positive predictive value was 100%, negative predictive value was 45%, and accuracy was 80%. Of all indices studied, k(ep) was the most significant in differentiating malignant from benign SPNs.
Fedorov A, Tuncali K, Fennessy FM, Tokuda J, Hata N, Wells WM, et al. Image registration for targeted MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2012;36 (4) :987-92. Abstract
PURPOSE: To develop and evaluate image registration methodology for automated re-identification of tumor-suspicious foci from preprocedural MR exams during MR-guided transperineal prostate core biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A hierarchical approach for automated registration between planning and intra-procedural T2-weighted prostate MRI was developed and evaluated on the images acquired during 10 consecutive MR-guided biopsies. Registration accuracy was quantified at image-based landmarks and by evaluating spatial overlap for the manually segmented prostate and sub-structures. Registration reliability was evaluated by simulating initial mis-registration and analyzing the convergence behavior. Registration precision was characterized at the planned biopsy targets. RESULTS: The total computation time was compatible with a clinical setting, being at most 2 min. Deformable registration led to a significant improvement in spatial overlap of the prostate and peripheral zone contours compared with both rigid and affine registration. Average in-slice landmark registration error was 1.3 ± 0.5 mm. Experiments simulating initial mis-registration resulted in an estimated average capture range of 6 mm and an average in-slice registration precision of ±0.3 mm. CONCLUSION: Our registration approach requires minimum user interaction and is compatible with the time constraints of our interventional clinical workflow. The initial evaluation shows acceptable accuracy, reliability and consistency of the method.
Tokuda J, Tuncali K, Iordachita I, Song S-E, Fedorov A, Oguro S, et al. In-bore setup and software for 3T MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy. Phys Med Biol. 2012;57 (18) :5823-40. Abstract
MRI-guided prostate biopsy in conventional closed-bore scanners requires transferring the patient outside the bore during needle insertion due to the constrained in-bore space, causing a safety hazard and limiting image feedback. To address this issue, we present our custom-made in-bore setup and software to support MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3 T MRI scanner. The setup consists of a specially designed tabletop and a needle-guiding template with a Z-frame that gives a physician access to the perineum of the patient at the imaging position and allows the physician to perform MRI-guided transperineal biopsy without moving the patient out of the scanner. The software and Z-frame allow registration of the template, target planning and biopsy guidance. Initially, we performed phantom experiments to assess the accuracy of template registration and needle placement in a controlled environment. Subsequently, we embarked on our clinical trial (N = 10). The phantom experiments showed that the translational errors of the template registration along the right-left (RP) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes were 1.1 ± 0.8 and 1.4 ± 1.1 mm, respectively, while the rotational errors around the RL, AP and superior-inferior axes were (0.8 ± 1.0)°, (1.7 ± 1.6)° and (0.0 ± 0.0)°, respectively. The 2D root-mean-square (RMS) needle-placement error was 3 mm. The clinical biopsy procedures were safely carried out in all ten clinical cases with a needle-placement error of 5.4 mm (2D RMS). In conclusion, transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3T scanner is feasible using our custom-made tabletop setup and software, which supports manual needle placement without moving the patient out of the magnet.
Egger J, Tokuda J, Chauvin L, Freisleben B, Nimsky C, Kapur T, et al. Integration of the OpenIGTLink network protocol for image-guided therapy with the medical platform MeVisLab. Int J Med Robot. 2012;8 (3) :282-90. Abstract
BACKGROUND: OpenIGTLink is a new, open, simple and extensible network communication protocol for image-guided therapy (IGT). The protocol provides a standardized mechanism to connect hardware and software by the transfer of coordinate transforms, images, and status messages. MeVisLab is a framework for the development of image processing algorithms and visualization and interaction methods, with a focus on medical imaging. METHODS: The paper describes the integration of the OpenIGTLink network protocol for IGT with the medical prototyping platform MeVisLab. The integration of OpenIGTLink into MeVisLab has been realized by developing a software module using the C++ programming language. RESULTS: The integration was evaluated with tracker clients that are available online. Furthermore, the integration was used to connect MeVisLab to Slicer and a NDI tracking system over the network. The latency time during navigation with a real instrument was measured to show that the integration can be used clinically. CONCLUSIONS: Researchers using MeVisLab can interface their software to hardware devices that already support the OpenIGTLink protocol, such as the NDI Aurora magnetic tracking system. In addition, the OpenIGTLink module can also be used to communicate directly with Slicer, a free, open source software package for visualization and image analysis.

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