Publications

2018
Doba N, Fukuda H, Numata K, Hao Y, Hara K, Nozaki A, et al. A new device for fiducial registration of image-guided navigation system for liver RFA. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2018;13 (1) :115-124. Abstract
PURPOSE: Radiofrequency ablation for liver tumors (liver RFA) is widely performed under ultrasound guidance. However, discriminating between the tumor and the needle is often difficult because of cavitation caused by RFA-induced coagulation. An unclear ultrasound image can lead to complications and tumor residue. Therefore, image-guided navigation systems based on fiducial registration have been developed. Fiducial points are usually set on a patient's skin. But the use of internal fiducial points can improve the accuracy of navigation. In this study, a new device is introduced to use internal fiducial points using 2D US. METHODS: 3D Slicer as the navigation software, Polaris Vicra as the position sensor, and two target tumors in a 3D abdominal phantom as puncture targets were used. Also, a new device that makes it possible to obtain tracking coordinates in the body was invented. First, two-dimensional reslice images from the CT images using 3D Slicer were built. A virtual needle was displayed on the two-dimensional reslice image, reflecting the movement of the actual needle after fiducial registration. A phantom experiment using three sets of fiducial point configurations: one conventional case using only surface points, and two cases in which the center of the target tumor was selected as a fiducial point was performed. For each configuration, one surgeon punctured each target tumor ten times under guidance from the 3D Slicer display. Finally, a statistical analysis examining the puncture error was performed. RESULTS: The puncture error for each target tumor decreased significantly when the center of the target tumor was included as one of the fiducial points, compared with when only surface points were used. CONCLUSION: This study introduces a new device to use internal fiducial points and suggests that the accuracy of image-guided navigation systems for liver RFA can be improved by using the new device.
2017
Johnson M, Chen Y, Hovet S, Xu S, Wood B, Ren H, et al. Fabricating biomedical origami: a state-of-the-art review. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2017;12 (11) :2023-2032. Abstract
PURPOSE: Origami-based biomedical device design is an emerging technology due to its ability to be deployed from a minimal foldable pattern to a larger volume. This paper aims to review state-of-the-art origami structures applied in the medical device field. METHODS: Publications and reports of origami structure related to medical device design from the past 10 years are reviewed and categorized according to engineering specifications, including the application field, fabrication material, size/volume, deployment method, manufacturability, and advantages. RESULTS: This paper presents an overview of the biomedical applications of devices based on origami structures, including disposable sterilization covers, cardiac catheterization, stent grafts, encapsulation and microsurgery, gastrointestinal microsurgery, laparoscopic surgical grippers, microgrippers, microfluidic devices, and drug delivery. Challenges in terms of materials and fabrication, assembly, modeling and computation design, and clinical adoptability are discussed at the end of this paper to provide guidance for future origami-based design in the medical device field. CONCLUSION: Concepts from origami can be used to design and develop novel medical devices. Origami-based medical device design is currently progressing, with researchers improving design methods, materials, fabrication techniques, and folding efficiency.
Su H, Iordachita II, Tokuda J, Hata N, Liu X, Seifabadi R, et al. Fiber Optic Force Sensors for MRI-Guided Interventions and Rehabilitation: A Review. IEEE Sens J. 2017;17 (7) :1952-1963. Abstract
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides both anatomical imaging with excellent soft tissue contrast and functional MRI imaging (fMRI) of physiological parameters. The last two decades have witnessed the manifestation of increased interest in MRI-guided minimally invasive intervention procedures and fMRI for rehabilitation and neuroscience research. Accompanying the aspiration to utilize MRI to provide imaging feedback during interventions and brain activity for neuroscience study, there is an accumulated effort to utilize force sensors compatible with the MRI environment to meet the growing demand of these procedures, with the goal of enhanced interventional safety and accuracy, improved efficacy and rehabilitation outcome. This paper summarizes the fundamental principles, the state of the art development and challenges of fiber optic force sensors for MRI-guided interventions and rehabilitation. It provides an overview of MRI-compatible fiber optic force sensors based on different sensing principles, including light intensity modulation, wavelength modulation, and phase modulation. Extensive design prototypes are reviewed to illustrate the detailed implementation of these principles. Advantages and disadvantages of the sensor designs are compared and analyzed. A perspective on the future development of fiber optic sensors is also presented which may have additional broad clinical applications. Future surgical interventions or rehabilitation will rely on intelligent force sensors to provide situational awareness to augment or complement human perception in these procedures.
de Arcos J, Schmidt EJ, Wang W, Tokuda J, Vij K, Seethamraju RT, et al. Prospective Clinical Implementation of a Novel Magnetic Resonance Tracking Device for Real-Time Brachytherapy Catheter Positioning. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2017;99 (3) :618-626. Abstract
PURPOSE: We designed and built dedicated active magnetic resonance (MR)-tracked (MRTR) stylets. We explored the role of MRTR in a prospective clinical trial. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eleven gynecologic cancer patients underwent MRTR to rapidly optimize interstitial catheter placement. MRTR catheter tip location and orientation were computed and overlaid on images displayed on in-room monitors at rates of 6 to 16 frames per second. Three modes of actively tracked navigation were analyzed: coarse navigation to the approximate region around the tumor; fine-tuning, bringing the stylets to the desired location; and pullback, with MRTR stylets rapidly withdrawn from within the catheters, providing catheter trajectories for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Catheters with conventional stylets were inserted, forming baseline locations. MRTR stylets were substituted, and catheter navigation was performed by a clinician working inside the MRI bore, using monitor feedback. RESULTS: Coarse navigation allowed repositioning of the MRTR catheters tips by 16 mm (mean), relative to baseline, in 14 ± 5 s/catheter (mean ± standard deviation [SD]). The fine-tuning mode repositioned the catheter tips by a further 12 mm, in 24 ± 17 s/catheter. Pullback mode provided catheter trajectories with RTP point resolution of ∼1.5 mm, in 1 to 9 s/catheter. CONCLUSIONS: MRTR-based navigation resulted in rapid and optimal placement of interstitial brachytherapy catheters. Catheters were repositioned compared with the initial insertion without tracking. In pullback mode, catheter trajectories matched computed tomographic precision, enabling their use for RTP.
Frank T, Krieger A, Leonard S, Patel NA, Tokuda J. ROS-IGTL-Bridge: an open network interface for image-guided therapy using the ROS environment. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2017;12 (8) :1451-1460. Abstract
PURPOSE: With the growing interest in advanced image-guidance for surgical robot systems, rapid integration and testing of robotic devices and medical image computing software are becoming essential in the research and development. Maximizing the use of existing engineering resources built on widely accepted platforms in different fields, such as robot operating system (ROS) in robotics and 3D Slicer in medical image computing could simplify these tasks. We propose a new open network bridge interface integrated in ROS to ensure seamless cross-platform data sharing. METHODS: A ROS node named ROS-IGTL-Bridge was implemented. It establishes a TCP/IP network connection between the ROS environment and external medical image computing software using the OpenIGTLink protocol. The node exports ROS messages to the external software over the network and vice versa simultaneously, allowing seamless and transparent data sharing between the ROS-based devices and the medical image computing platforms. RESULTS: Performance tests demonstrated that the bridge could stream transforms, strings, points, and images at 30 fps in both directions successfully. The data transfer latency was <1.2 ms for transforms, strings and points, and 25.2 ms for color VGA images. A separate test also demonstrated that the bridge could achieve 900 fps for transforms. Additionally, the bridge was demonstrated in two representative systems: a mock image-guided surgical robot setup consisting of 3D slicer, and Lego Mindstorms with ROS as a prototyping and educational platform for IGT research; and the smart tissue autonomous robot surgical setup with 3D Slicer. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated that the bridge enabled cross-platform data sharing between ROS and medical image computing software. This will allow rapid and seamless integration of advanced image-based planning/navigation offered by the medical image computing software such as 3D Slicer into ROS-based surgical robot systems.
2016
Hata N, Song S-E, Olubiyi O, Arimitsu Y, Fujimoto K, Kato T, et al. Body-mounted robotic instrument guide for image-guided cryotherapy of renal cancer. Med Phys. 2016;43 (2) :843-53. Abstract
PURPOSE: Image-guided cryotherapy of renal cancer is an emerging alternative to surgical nephrectomy, particularly for those who cannot sustain the physical burden of surgery. It is well known that the outcome of this therapy depends on the accurate placement of the cryotherapy probe. Therefore, a robotic instrument guide may help physicians aim the cryotherapy probe precisely to maximize the efficacy of the treatment and avoid damage to critical surrounding structures. The objective of this paper was to propose a robotic instrument guide for orienting cryotherapy probes in image-guided cryotherapy of renal cancers. The authors propose a body-mounted robotic guide that is expected to be less susceptible to guidance errors caused by the patient's whole body motion. METHODS: Keeping the device's minimal footprint in mind, the authors developed and validated a body-mounted, robotic instrument guide that can maintain the geometrical relationship between the device and the patient's body, even in the presence of the patient's frequent body motions. The guide can orient the cryotherapy probe with the skin incision point as the remote-center-of-motion. The authors' validation studies included an evaluation of the mechanical accuracy and position repeatability of the robotic instrument guide. The authors also performed a mock MRI-guided cryotherapy procedure with a phantom to compare the advantage of robotically assisted probe replacements over a free-hand approach, by introducing organ motions to investigate their effects on the accurate placement of the cryotherapy probe. Measurements collected for performance analysis included accuracy and time taken for probe placements. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess if either or both organ motion and the robotic guide impacted these measurements. RESULTS: The mechanical accuracy and position repeatability of the probe placement using the robotic instrument guide were 0.3 and 0.1 mm, respectively, at a depth of 80 mm. The phantom test indicated that the accuracy of probe placement was significantly better with the robotic instrument guide (4.1 mm) than without the guide (6.3 mm, p<0.001), even in the presence of body motion. When independent organ motion was artificially added, in addition to body motion, the advantage of accurate probe placement using the robotic instrument guide disappeared statistically [i.e., 6.0 mm with the robotic guide and 5.9 mm without the robotic guide (p = 0.906)]. When the robotic instrument guide was used, the total time required to complete the procedure was reduced from 19.6 to 12.7 min (p<0.001). Multivariable analysis indicated that the robotic instrument guide, not the organ motion, was the cause of statistical significance. The statistical power the authors obtained was 88% in accuracy assessment and 99% higher in duration measurement. CONCLUSIONS: The body-mounted robotic instrument guide allows positioning of the probe during image-guided cryotherapy of renal cancer and was done in fewer attempts and in less time than the free-hand approach. The accuracy of the placement of the cryotherapy probe was better using the robotic instrument guide than without the guide when no organ motion was present. The accuracy between the robotic and free-hand approach becomes comparable when organ motion was present.
Ciris PA, Balasubramanian M, Seethamraju RT, Tokuda J, Scalera J, Penzkofer T, et al. Characterization of gradient echo signal decays in healthy and cancerous prostate at 3T improves with a Gaussian augmentation of the mono-exponential (GAME) model. NMR Biomed. 2016;29 (7) :999-1009. Abstract
A biomarker of cancer aggressiveness, such as hypoxia, could substantially impact treatment decisions in the prostate, especially radiation therapy, by balancing treatment morbidity (urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, etc.) against mortality. R2 (*) mapping with Mono-Exponential (ME) decay modeling has shown potential for identifying areas of prostate cancer hypoxia at 1.5T. However, Gaussian deviations from ME decay have been observed in other tissues at 3T. The purpose of this study is to assess whether gradient-echo signal decays are better characterized by a standard ME decay model, or a Gaussian Augmentation of the Mono-Exponential (GAME) decay model, in the prostate at 3T. Multi-gradient-echo signals were acquired on 20 consecutive patients with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer undergoing MR-guided prostate biopsies. Data were fitted with both ME and GAME models. The information contents of these models were compared using Akaike's information criterion (second order, AICC ), in skeletal muscle, the prostate central gland (CG), and peripheral zone (PZ) regions of interest (ROIs). The GAME model had higher information content in 30% of the prostate on average (across all patients and ROIs), covering up to 67% of cancerous PZ ROIs, and up to 100% of cancerous CG ROIs (in individual patients). The higher information content of GAME became more prominent in regions that would be assumed hypoxic using ME alone, reaching 50% of the PZ and 70% of the CG as ME R2 (*) approached 40 s(-1) . R2 (*) mapping may have important applications in MRI; however, information lost due to modeling could mask differences in parameters due to underlying tissue anatomy or physiology. The GAME model improves characterization of signal behavior in the prostate at 3T, and may increase the potential for determining correlates of fit parameters with biomarkers, for example of oxygenation status.
Eslami S, Shang W, Li G, Patel N, Fischer GS, Tokuda J, et al. In-bore prostate transperineal interventions with an MRI-guided parallel manipulator: system development and preliminary evaluation. Int J Med Robot. 2016;12 (2) :199-213. Abstract
BACKGROUND: Robot-assisted minimally-invasive surgery is well recognized as a feasible solution for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in humans. METHODS: This paper discusses the kinematics of a parallel 4 Degrees-of-Freedom (DOF) surgical manipulator designed for minimally invasive in-bore prostate percutaneous interventions through the patient's perineum. The proposed manipulator takes advantage of four sliders actuated by MRI-compatible piezoelectric motors and incremental rotary encoders. Errors, mostly originating from the design and manufacturing process, need to be identified and reduced before the robot is deployed in clinical trials. RESULTS: The manipulator has undergone several experiments to evaluate the repeatability and accuracy (about 1 mm in air (in x or y direction) at the needle's reference point) of needle placement, which is an essential concern in percutaneous prostate interventions. CONCLUSION: The acquired results endorse the sustainability, precision and reliability of the manipulator. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Tani S, Tatli S, Hata N, Garcia-Rojas X, Olubiyi OI, Silverman SG, et al. Three-dimensional quantitative assessment of ablation margins based on registration of pre- and post-procedural MRI and distance map. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2016;11 (6) :1133-42. Abstract
PURPOSE: Contrast-enhanced MR images are widely used to confirm the adequacy of ablation margin after liver ablation for early prediction of local recurrence. However, quantitative assessment of the ablation margin by comparing pre- and post-procedural images remains challenging. We developed and tested a novel method for three-dimensional quantitative assessment of ablation margin based on non-rigid image registration and 3D distance map. METHODS: Our method was tested with pre- and post-procedural MR images acquired in 21 patients who underwent image-guided percutaneous liver ablation. The two images were co-registered using non-rigid intensity-based registration. After the tumor and ablation volumes were segmented, target volume coverage, percent of tumor coverage, and Dice similarity coefficient were calculated as metrics representing overall adequacy of ablation. In addition, 3D distance map around the tumor was computed and superimposed on the ablation volume to identify the area with insufficient margins. For patients with local recurrences, the follow-up images were registered to the post-procedural image. Three-dimensional minimum distance between the recurrence and the areas with insufficient margins was quantified. RESULTS: The percent tumor coverage for all nonrecurrent cases was 100 %. Five cases had tumor recurrences, and the 3D distance map revealed insufficient tumor coverage or a 0-mm margin. It also showed that two recurrences were remote to the insufficient margin. CONCLUSIONS: Non-rigid registration and 3D distance map allow us to quantitatively evaluate the adequacy of the ablation margin after percutaneous liver ablation. The method may be useful to predict local recurrences immediately following ablation procedure.
Hata N, Song S-E, Olubiyi O, Arimitsu Y, Fujimoto K, Kato T, et al. Body-mounted robotic instrument guide for image-guided cryotherapy of renal cancer. Med Phys. 2016;43 (2) :843-53. Abstract
PURPOSE: Image-guided cryotherapy of renal cancer is an emerging alternative to surgical nephrectomy, particularly for those who cannot sustain the physical burden of surgery. It is well known that the outcome of this therapy depends on the accurate placement of the cryotherapy probe. Therefore, a robotic instrument guide may help physicians aim the cryotherapy probe precisely to maximize the efficacy of the treatment and avoid damage to critical surrounding structures. The objective of this paper was to propose a robotic instrument guide for orienting cryotherapy probes in image-guided cryotherapy of renal cancers. The authors propose a body-mounted robotic guide that is expected to be less susceptible to guidance errors caused by the patient's whole body motion. METHODS: Keeping the device's minimal footprint in mind, the authors developed and validated a body-mounted, robotic instrument guide that can maintain the geometrical relationship between the device and the patient's body, even in the presence of the patient's frequent body motions. The guide can orient the cryotherapy probe with the skin incision point as the remote-center-of-motion. The authors' validation studies included an evaluation of the mechanical accuracy and position repeatability of the robotic instrument guide. The authors also performed a mock MRI-guided cryotherapy procedure with a phantom to compare the advantage of robotically assisted probe replacements over a free-hand approach, by introducing organ motions to investigate their effects on the accurate placement of the cryotherapy probe. Measurements collected for performance analysis included accuracy and time taken for probe placements. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess if either or both organ motion and the robotic guide impacted these measurements. RESULTS: The mechanical accuracy and position repeatability of the probe placement using the robotic instrument guide were 0.3 and 0.1 mm, respectively, at a depth of 80 mm. The phantom test indicated that the accuracy of probe placement was significantly better with the robotic instrument guide (4.1 mm) than without the guide (6.3 mm, p<0.001), even in the presence of body motion. When independent organ motion was artificially added, in addition to body motion, the advantage of accurate probe placement using the robotic instrument guide disappeared statistically [i.e., 6.0 mm with the robotic guide and 5.9 mm without the robotic guide (p = 0.906)]. When the robotic instrument guide was used, the total time required to complete the procedure was reduced from 19.6 to 12.7 min (p<0.001). Multivariable analysis indicated that the robotic instrument guide, not the organ motion, was the cause of statistical significance. The statistical power the authors obtained was 88% in accuracy assessment and 99% higher in duration measurement. CONCLUSIONS: The body-mounted robotic instrument guide allows positioning of the probe during image-guided cryotherapy of renal cancer and was done in fewer attempts and in less time than the free-hand approach. The accuracy of the placement of the cryotherapy probe was better using the robotic instrument guide than without the guide when no organ motion was present. The accuracy between the robotic and free-hand approach becomes comparable when organ motion was present.
Ciris PA, Balasubramanian M, Seethamraju RT, Tokuda J, Scalera J, Penzkofer T, et al. Characterization of gradient echo signal decays in healthy and cancerous prostate at 3T improves with a Gaussian augmentation of the mono-exponential (GAME) model. NMR Biomed. 2016;29 (7) :999-1009. Abstract
A biomarker of cancer aggressiveness, such as hypoxia, could substantially impact treatment decisions in the prostate, especially radiation therapy, by balancing treatment morbidity (urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, etc.) against mortality. R2 (*) mapping with Mono-Exponential (ME) decay modeling has shown potential for identifying areas of prostate cancer hypoxia at 1.5T. However, Gaussian deviations from ME decay have been observed in other tissues at 3T. The purpose of this study is to assess whether gradient-echo signal decays are better characterized by a standard ME decay model, or a Gaussian Augmentation of the Mono-Exponential (GAME) decay model, in the prostate at 3T. Multi-gradient-echo signals were acquired on 20 consecutive patients with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer undergoing MR-guided prostate biopsies. Data were fitted with both ME and GAME models. The information contents of these models were compared using Akaike's information criterion (second order, AICC ), in skeletal muscle, the prostate central gland (CG), and peripheral zone (PZ) regions of interest (ROIs). The GAME model had higher information content in 30% of the prostate on average (across all patients and ROIs), covering up to 67% of cancerous PZ ROIs, and up to 100% of cancerous CG ROIs (in individual patients). The higher information content of GAME became more prominent in regions that would be assumed hypoxic using ME alone, reaching 50% of the PZ and 70% of the CG as ME R2 (*) approached 40 s(-1) . R2 (*) mapping may have important applications in MRI; however, information lost due to modeling could mask differences in parameters due to underlying tissue anatomy or physiology. The GAME model improves characterization of signal behavior in the prostate at 3T, and may increase the potential for determining correlates of fit parameters with biomarkers, for example of oxygenation status.
Eslami S, Shang W, Li G, Patel N, Fischer GS, Tokuda J, et al. In-bore prostate transperineal interventions with an MRI-guided parallel manipulator: system development and preliminary evaluation. Int J Med Robot. 2016;12 (2) :199-213. Abstract
BACKGROUND: Robot-assisted minimally-invasive surgery is well recognized as a feasible solution for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in humans. METHODS: This paper discusses the kinematics of a parallel 4 Degrees-of-Freedom (DOF) surgical manipulator designed for minimally invasive in-bore prostate percutaneous interventions through the patient's perineum. The proposed manipulator takes advantage of four sliders actuated by MRI-compatible piezoelectric motors and incremental rotary encoders. Errors, mostly originating from the design and manufacturing process, need to be identified and reduced before the robot is deployed in clinical trials. RESULTS: The manipulator has undergone several experiments to evaluate the repeatability and accuracy (about 1 mm in air (in x or y direction) at the needle's reference point) of needle placement, which is an essential concern in percutaneous prostate interventions. CONCLUSION: The acquired results endorse the sustainability, precision and reliability of the manipulator. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Kapur T, Pieper S, Fedorov A, Fillion-Robin J-C, Halle M, O'donnell L, et al. Increasing the impact of medical image computing using community-based open-access hackathons: The NA-MIC and 3D Slicer experience. Med Image Anal. 2016;33 :176-180. Abstract
The National Alliance for Medical Image Computing (NA-MIC) was launched in 2004 with the goal of investigating and developing an open source software infrastructure for the extraction of information and knowledge from medical images using computational methods. Several leading research and engineering groups participated in this effort that was funded by the US National Institutes of Health through a variety of infrastructure grants. This effort transformed 3D Slicer from an internal, Boston-based, academic research software application into a professionally maintained, robust, open source platform with an international leadership and developer and user communities. Critical improvements to the widely used underlying open source libraries and tools-VTK, ITK, CMake, CDash, DCMTK-were an additional consequence of this effort. This project has contributed to close to a thousand peer-reviewed publications and a growing portfolio of US and international funded efforts expanding the use of these tools in new medical computing applications every year. In this editorial, we discuss what we believe are gaps in the way medical image computing is pursued today; how a well-executed research platform can enable discovery, innovation and reproducible science ("Open Science"); and how our quest to build such a software platform has evolved into a productive and rewarding social engineering exercise in building an open-access community with a shared vision.
Tani S, Tatli S, Hata N, Garcia-Rojas X, Olubiyi OI, Silverman SG, et al. Three-dimensional quantitative assessment of ablation margins based on registration of pre- and post-procedural MRI and distance map. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2016;11 (6) :1133-42. Abstract
PURPOSE: Contrast-enhanced MR images are widely used to confirm the adequacy of ablation margin after liver ablation for early prediction of local recurrence. However, quantitative assessment of the ablation margin by comparing pre- and post-procedural images remains challenging. We developed and tested a novel method for three-dimensional quantitative assessment of ablation margin based on non-rigid image registration and 3D distance map. METHODS: Our method was tested with pre- and post-procedural MR images acquired in 21 patients who underwent image-guided percutaneous liver ablation. The two images were co-registered using non-rigid intensity-based registration. After the tumor and ablation volumes were segmented, target volume coverage, percent of tumor coverage, and Dice similarity coefficient were calculated as metrics representing overall adequacy of ablation. In addition, 3D distance map around the tumor was computed and superimposed on the ablation volume to identify the area with insufficient margins. For patients with local recurrences, the follow-up images were registered to the post-procedural image. Three-dimensional minimum distance between the recurrence and the areas with insufficient margins was quantified. RESULTS: The percent tumor coverage for all nonrecurrent cases was 100 %. Five cases had tumor recurrences, and the 3D distance map revealed insufficient tumor coverage or a 0-mm margin. It also showed that two recurrences were remote to the insufficient margin. CONCLUSIONS: Non-rigid registration and 3D distance map allow us to quantitatively evaluate the adequacy of the ablation margin after percutaneous liver ablation. The method may be useful to predict local recurrences immediately following ablation procedure.
2015
Tilak G, Tuncali K, Song S-E, Tokuda J, Olubiyi O, Fennessy F, et al. 3T MR-guided in-bore transperineal prostate biopsy: A comparison of robotic and manual needle-guidance templates. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2015;42 (1) :63-71. Abstract
PURPOSE: To demonstrate the utility of a robotic needle-guidance template device as compared to a manual template for in-bore 3T transperineal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided prostate biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This two-arm mixed retrospective-prospective study included 99 cases of targeted transperineal prostate biopsies. The biopsy needles were aimed at suspicious foci noted on multiparametric 3T MRI using manual template (historical control) as compared with a robotic template. The following data were obtained: the accuracy of average and closest needle placement to the focus, histologic yield, percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples, complication rate, and time to complete the procedure. RESULTS: In all, 56 cases were performed using the manual template and 43 cases were performed using the robotic template. The mean accuracy of the best needle placement attempt was higher in the robotic group (2.39 mm) than the manual group (3.71 mm, P < 0.027). The mean core procedure time was shorter in the robotic (90.82 min) than the manual group (100.63 min, P < 0.030). Percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples was higher in the robotic group (P < 0.001). Cancer yields and complication rates were not statistically different between the two subgroups (P = 0.557 and P = 0.172, respectively). CONCLUSION: The robotic needle-guidance template helps accurate placement of biopsy needles in MRI-guided core biopsy of prostate cancer.
Wang W, Viswanathan AN, Damato AL, Chen Y, Tse Z, Pan L, et al. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy. Med Phys. 2015;42 (12) :7114-21. Abstract
PURPOSE: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. METHODS: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter's trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High-resolution 3D MRI of the phantom was performed followed by catheter digitization based on the catheter's imaging artifacts. The catheter trajectory error was characterized in terms of the mean distance between corresponding dwell points in MRTR-generated catheter trajectory and MRI-based catheter digitization. The MRTR-based catheter trajectory reconstruction process was also performed on three gynecologic cancer patients, and then compared with catheter digitization based on MRI and CT. RESULTS: The catheter tip localization error increased as the MRTR stylet moved further off-center and as the stylet's orientation deviated from the main magnetic field direction. Fifteen catheters' trajectories were reconstructed by MRTR. Compared with MRI-based digitization, the mean 3D error of MRTR-generated trajectories was 1.5 ± 0.5 mm with an in-plane error of 0.7 ± 0.2 mm and a tip error of 1.7 ± 0.5 mm. MRTR resolved ambiguity in catheter assignment due to crossed catheter paths, which is a common problem in image-based catheter digitization. In the patient studies, the MRTR-generated catheter trajectory was consistent with digitization based on both MRI and CT. CONCLUSIONS: The MRTR system provides accurate catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction in the MR environment. Relative to the image-based methods, it improves the speed, safety, and reliability of the catheter trajectory reconstruction in interstitial brachytherapy. MRTR may enable in-procedural dosimetric evaluation of implant target coverage.
Tokuda J, Plishker W, Torabi M, Olubiyi OI, Zaki G, Tatli S, et al. Graphics Processing Unit-Accelerated Nonrigid Registration of MR Images to CT Images During CT-Guided Percutaneous Liver Tumor Ablations. Acad Radiol. 2015;22 (6) :722-33. Abstract
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid magnetic resonance (MR) to computed tomography (CT) image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. Although both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique on the basis of volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphics processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice similarity coefficient [DSC] and 95% Hausdorff distance [HD]) and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student t test. RESULTS: Accuracies of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively, were 88.3 ± 3.7% versus 89.3 ± 4.9% (P = .41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 versus 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (P = .15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 versus 557 ± 116 seconds (P < .000000002), respectively; there was no significant difference in computation time despite the difference in the complexity of the algorithms (P = .71). CONCLUSIONS: The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique was as accurate as the B-spline technique and required significantly less processing time. The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique may enable the implementation of nonrigid registration into routine clinical practice.
Su H, Shang W, Cole G, Li G, Harrington K, Camilo A, et al. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy. IEEE ASME Trans Mechatron. 2015;20 (4) :1920-1932. Abstract
This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian motion module. The needle driver provides needle cannula translation and rotation (2-DOF) and stylet translation (1-DOF). A custom robot controller consisting of multiple piezoelectric motor drivers provides precision closed-loop control of piezoelectric motors and enables simultaneous robot motion and MR imaging. The developed modular robot control interface software performs image-based registration, kinematics calculation, and exchanges robot commands and coordinates between the navigation software and the robot controller with a new implementation of the open network communication protocol OpenIGTLink. Comprehensive compatibility of the robot is evaluated inside a 3-Tesla MRI scanner using standard imaging sequences and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss is limited to 15%. The image deterioration due to the present and motion of robot demonstrates unobservable image interference. Twenty-five targeted needle placements inside gelatin phantoms utilizing an 18-gauge ceramic needle demonstrated 0.87 mm root mean square (RMS) error in 3D Euclidean distance based on MRI volume segmentation of the image-guided robotic needle placement procedure.
Penzkofer T, Tuncali K, Fedorov A, Song S-E, Tokuda J, Fennessy FM, et al. Transperineal in-bore 3-T MR imaging-guided prostate biopsy: a prospective clinical observational study. Radiology. 2015;274 (1) :170-80. Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the detection rate, clinical relevance, Gleason grade, and location of prostate cancer ( PCa prostate cancer ) diagnosed with and the safety of an in-bore transperineal 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided prostate biopsy in a clinically heterogeneous patient population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective retrospectively analyzed study was HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved, and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-seven men (mean age, 66.2 years ± 6.9) underwent multiparametric endorectal prostate MR imaging at 3 T and transperineal MR imaging-guided biopsy. Three subgroups of patients with at least one lesion suspicious for cancer were included: men with no prior PCa prostate cancer diagnosis, men with PCa prostate cancer who were undergoing active surveillance, and men with treated PCa prostate cancer and suspected recurrence. Exclusion criteria were prior prostatectomy and/or contraindication to 3-T MR imaging. The transperineal MR imaging-guided biopsy was performed in a 70-cm wide-bore 3-T device. Overall patient biopsy outcomes, cancer detection rates, Gleason grade, and location for each subgroup were evaluated and statistically compared by using χ(2) and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc comparisons. RESULTS: Ninety biopsy procedures were performed with no serious adverse events, with a mean of 3.7 targets sampled per gland. Cancer was detected in 51 (56.7%) men: 48.1% (25 of 52) with no prior PCa prostate cancer , 61.5% (eight of 13) under active surveillance, and 72.0% (18 of 25) in whom recurrence was suspected. Gleason pattern 4 or higher was diagnosed in 78.1% (25 of 32) in the no prior PCa prostate cancer and active surveillance groups. Gleason scores were not assigned in the suspected recurrence group. MR targets located in the anterior prostate had the highest cancer yield (40 of 64, 62.5%) compared with those for the other parts of the prostate (P < .001). CONCLUSION: In-bore 3-T transperineal MR imaging-guided biopsy, with a mean of 3.7 targets per gland, allowed detection of many clinically relevant cancers, many of which were located anteriorly.
Tilak G, Tuncali K, Song S-E, Tokuda J, Olubiyi O, Fennessy F, et al. 3T MR-guided in-bore transperineal prostate biopsy: A comparison of robotic and manual needle-guidance templates. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2015;42 (1) :63-71. Abstract
PURPOSE: To demonstrate the utility of a robotic needle-guidance template device as compared to a manual template for in-bore 3T transperineal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided prostate biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This two-arm mixed retrospective-prospective study included 99 cases of targeted transperineal prostate biopsies. The biopsy needles were aimed at suspicious foci noted on multiparametric 3T MRI using manual template (historical control) as compared with a robotic template. The following data were obtained: the accuracy of average and closest needle placement to the focus, histologic yield, percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples, complication rate, and time to complete the procedure. RESULTS: In all, 56 cases were performed using the manual template and 43 cases were performed using the robotic template. The mean accuracy of the best needle placement attempt was higher in the robotic group (2.39 mm) than the manual group (3.71 mm, P < 0.027). The mean core procedure time was shorter in the robotic (90.82 min) than the manual group (100.63 min, P < 0.030). Percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples was higher in the robotic group (P < 0.001). Cancer yields and complication rates were not statistically different between the two subgroups (P = 0.557 and P = 0.172, respectively). CONCLUSION: The robotic needle-guidance template helps accurate placement of biopsy needles in MRI-guided core biopsy of prostate cancer.

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