Releasing crowding prior to a saccade requires more than “attention”: response to van Koningsbruggen and Buonocore

Citation:

Harrison, W.J., Mattingley, J.B. & Remington, R.W. Releasing crowding prior to a saccade requires more than “attention”: response to van Koningsbruggen and Buonocore. The Journal of Neuroscience 33, 28, (2013). Copy at https://j.mp/2ovMQ2q

Abstract:

We thank van Koningsbruggen and Buonocore (2013) for their interest in our recent study, in which we investigated the relationship between eye movements and visual crowding, the phenomenon whereby a target object in peripheral vision is made difficult to recognize when closely flanked by distractor objects (Pelli and Tillman, 2008). We found that, just prior to a saccadic eye movement, the deleterious effects of crowding are reliably diminished at the saccade goal (Harrison et al., 2013a). As plausible explanations for such a pre-saccadic release from crowding, we discussed changes in the gain of visual neurons (e.g. Moore and Armstrong, 2003), a reduction in probabilistic positional uncertainty (Greenwood et al., 2009; van den Berg et al., 2012), and receptive-field shifts (Tolias et al., 2001) brought about by the known neurophysiological links between oculomotor and visual areas (for reviews, see Schall, 2002; Moore et al., 2003). Van Koningsbruggen and Buonocore have proposed two interesting alternative explanations for our results, and we respond to these here.

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