Publications by Year: 2015

2015
Yanmei Tie, Laura Rigolo, Aysegul Ozdemir Ovalioglu, Olutayo Olubiyi, Kelly L Doolin, Srinivasan Mukundan, and Alexandra J Golby. 9/2015. “A New Paradigm for Individual Subject Language Mapping: Movie-Watching fMRI.” J Neuroimaging, 25, 5, Pp. 710-20.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Functional MRI (fMRI) based on language tasks has been used in presurgical language mapping in patients with lesions in or near putative language areas. However, if patients have difficulty performing the tasks due to neurological deficits, it leads to unreliable or noninterpretable results. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using a movie-watching fMRI for language mapping. METHODS: A 7-minute movie clip with contrasting speech and nonspeech segments was shown to 22 right-handed healthy subjects. Based on all subjects' language functional regions-of-interest, 6 language response areas were defined, within which a language response model (LRM) was derived by extracting the main temporal activation profile. Using a leave-one-out procedure, individuals' language areas were identified as the areas that expressed highly correlated temporal responses with the LRM derived from an independent group of subjects. RESULTS: Compared with an antonym generation task-based fMRI, the movie-watching fMRI generated language maps with more localized activations in the left frontal language area, larger activations in the left temporoparietal language area, and significant activations in their right-hemisphere homologues. Results of 2 brain tumor patients' movie-watching fMRI using the LRM derived from the healthy subjects indicated its ability to map putative language areas; while their task-based fMRI maps were less robust and noisier. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that it is feasible to use this novel "task-free" paradigm as a complementary tool for fMRI language mapping when patients cannot perform the tasks. Its deployment in more neurosurgical patients and validation against gold-standard techniques need further investigation.
Olutayo Ibukunolu Olubiyi, Aysegul Ozdemir, Fatih Incekara, Yanmei Tie, Parviz Dolati, Liangge Hsu, Sandro Santagata, Zhenrui Chen, Laura Rigolo, and Alexandra J Golby. 8/2015. “Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Intracranial Glioma Resection: A Single-Center, Retrospective Blinded Volumetric Study.” World Neurosurg, 84, 2, Pp. 528-36.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (IoMRI) was devised to overcome brain shifts during craniotomies. Yet, the acceptance of IoMRI is limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate impact of IoMRI on intracranial glioma resection outcome including overall patient survival. METHODS: A retrospective review of records was performed on a cohort of 164 consecutive patients who underwent resection surgery for newly diagnosed intracranial gliomas either with or without IoMRI technology performed by 2 neurosurgeons in our center. Patient follow-up was at least 5 years. Extent of resection (EOR) was calculated using pre- and postoperative contrast-enhanced and T2-weighted MR-images. Adjusted analysis was performed to compare gross total resection (GTR), EOR, permanent surgery-associated neurologic deficit, and overall survival between the 2 groups. RESULTS: Overall median EOR was 92.1%, and 97.45% with IoMRI use and 89.9% without IoMRI, with crude (unadjusted) P < 0.005. GTR was achieved in 49.3% of IoMRI cases, versus in only 21.4% of no-IoMRI cases, P < 0.001. GTR achieved was more with the use of IoMRI among gliomas located in both eloquent and noneloquent brain areas, P = 0.017 and <0.001, respectively. Permanent surgery-associated neurologic deficit was not (statistically) more significant with no-IoMRI, P = 0.284 (13.8% vs. 6.7%). In addition, the IoMRI group had better 5-year overall survival, P < 0.001. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the use of IoMRI was associated with greater rates of EOR and GTR, and better overall 5-year survival in both eloquent brain areas located and non-eloquent brain areas located gliomas, with no increased risk of neurologic complication.
Zhenrui Chen, Yanmei Tie, Olutayo Olubiyi, Laura Rigolo, Alireza Mehrtash, Isaiah Norton, Ofer Pasternak, Yogesh Rathi, Alexandra J Golby, and Lauren J O'Donnell. 3/2015. “Reconstruction of the Arcuate Fasciculus for Surgical Planning in the Setting of Peritumoral Edema using Two-tensor Unscented Kalman Filter Tractography.” Neuroimage Clin, 7, Pp. 815-22.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Diffusion imaging tractography is increasingly used to trace critical fiber tracts in brain tumor patients to reduce the risk of post-operative neurological deficit. However, the effects of peritumoral edema pose a challenge to conventional tractography using the standard diffusion tensor model. The aim of this study was to present a novel technique using a two-tensor unscented Kalman filter (UKF) algorithm to track the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in brain tumor patients with peritumoral edema. METHODS: Ten right-handed patients with left-sided brain tumors in the vicinity of language-related cortex and evidence of significant peritumoral edema were retrospectively selected for the study. All patients underwent 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including a diffusion-weighted dataset with 31 directions. Fiber tractography was performed using both single-tensor streamline and two-tensor UKF tractography. A two-regions-of-interest approach was applied to perform the delineation of the AF. Results from the two different tractography algorithms were compared visually and quantitatively. RESULTS: Using single-tensor streamline tractography, the AF appeared disrupted in four patients and contained few fibers in the remaining six patients. Two-tensor UKF tractography delineated an AF that traversed edematous brain areas in all patients. The volume of the AF was significantly larger on two-tensor UKF than on single-tensor streamline tractography (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Two-tensor UKF tractography provides the ability to trace a larger volume AF than single-tensor streamline tractography in the setting of peritumoral edema in brain tumor patients.
Alireza Radmanesh, Amir A Zamani, Stephen Whalen, Yanmei Tie, Ralph O Suarez, and Alexandra J Golby. 2/2015. “Comparison of Seeding Methods for Visualization of the Corticospinal Tracts using Single Tensor Tractography.” Clin Neurol Neurosurg, 129, Pp. 44-9.Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To compare five different seeding methods to delineate hand, foot, and lip components of the corticospinal tract (CST) using single tensor tractography. METHODS: We studied five healthy subjects and 10 brain tumor patients. For each subject, we used five different seeding methods, from (1) cerebral peduncle (CP), (2) posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC), (3) white matter subjacent to functional MRI activations (fMRI), (4) whole brain and then selecting the fibers that pass through both fMRI and CP (WBF-CP), and (5) whole brain and then selecting the fibers that pass through both fMRI and PLIC (WBF-PLIC). Two blinded neuroradiologists rated delineations as anatomically successful or unsuccessful tractography. The proportions of successful trials from different methods were compared by Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: To delineate hand motor tract, seeding through fMRI activation areas was more effective than through CP (p<0.01), but not significantly different from PLIC (p>0.1). WBF-CP delineated hand motor tracts in a larger proportion of trials than CP alone (p<0.05). Similarly, WBF-PLIC depicted hand motor tracts in a larger proportion of trials than PLIC alone (p<0.01). Foot motor tracts were delineated in all trials by either PLIC or whole brain seeding (WBF-CP and WBF-PLIC). Seeding from CP or fMRI activation resulted in foot motor tract visualization in 87% of the trials (95% confidence interval: 60-98%). The lip motor tracts were delineated only by WBF-PLIC and in 36% of trials (95% confidence interval: 11-69%). CONCLUSIONS: Whole brain seeding and then selecting the tracts that pass through two anatomically relevant ROIs can delineate more plausible hand and lip motor tracts than seeding from a single ROI. Foot motor tracts can be successfully delineated regardless of the seeding method used.