Publications

2019
Flavahan WA, Drier Y, Johnstone SE, Hemming ML, Tarjan DR, Hegazi E, Shareef SJ, Javed NM, Raut CP, Eschle BK, Gokhale PC, Hornick JL, Sicinska ET, Demetri GD, Bernstein BE. Altered chromosomal topology drives oncogenic programs in SDH-deficient GISTs. Nature 2019;575(7781):229-233.Abstract
Epigenetic aberrations are widespread in cancer, yet the underlying mechanisms and causality remain poorly understood. A subset of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) lack canonical kinase mutations but instead have succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency and global DNA hyper-methylation. Here, we associate this hyper-methylation with changes in genome topology that activate oncogenic programs. To investigate epigenetic alterations systematically, we mapped DNA methylation, CTCF insulators, enhancers, and chromosome topology in KIT-mutant, PDGFRA-mutant and SDH-deficient GISTs. Although these respective subtypes shared similar enhancer landscapes, we identified hundreds of putative insulators where DNA methylation replaced CTCF binding in SDH-deficient GISTs. We focused on a disrupted insulator that normally partitions a core GIST super-enhancer from the FGF4 oncogene. Recurrent loss of this insulator alters locus topology in SDH-deficient GISTs, allowing aberrant physical interaction between enhancer and oncogene. CRISPR-mediated excision of the corresponding CTCF motifs in an SDH-intact GIST model disrupted the boundary between enhancer and oncogene, and strongly upregulated FGF4 expression. We also identified a second recurrent insulator loss event near the KIT oncogene, which is also highly expressed across SDH-deficient GISTs. Finally, we established a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) from an SDH-deficient GIST that faithfully maintains the epigenetics of the parental tumour, including hypermethylation and insulator defects. This PDX model is highly sensitive to FGF receptor (FGFR) inhibition, and more so to combined FGFR and KIT inhibition, validating the functional significance of the underlying epigenetic lesions. Our study reveals how epigenetic alterations can drive oncogenic programs in the absence of canonical kinase mutations, with implications for mechanistic targeting of aberrant pathways in cancers.
Raoof S, Mulford IJ, Frisco-Cabanos H, Nangia V, Timonina D, Labrot E, Hafeez N, Bilton SJ, Drier Y, Ji F, Greenberg M, Williams A, Kattermann K, Damon L, Sovath S, Rakiec DP, Korn JM, Ruddy DA, Benes CH, Hammerman PS, Piotrowska Z, Sequist LV, Niederst MJ, Barretina J, Engelman JA, Hata AN. Targeting FGFR overcomes EMT-mediated resistance in EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer. Oncogene 2019;Abstract
Evolved resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-targeted therapies remains a major clinical challenge. In epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), failure of EGFR TKIs can result from both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of acquired drug resistance. Widespread reports of histologic and gene expression changes consistent with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been associated with initially surviving drug-tolerant persister cells, which can seed bona fide genetic mechanisms of resistance to EGFR TKIs. While therapeutic approaches targeting fully resistant cells, such as those harboring an EGFR mutation, have been developed, a clinical strategy for preventing the emergence of persister cells remains elusive. Using mesenchymal cell lines derived from biopsies of patients who progressed on EGFR TKI as surrogates for persister populations, we performed whole-genome CRISPR screening and identified fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) as the top target promoting survival of mesenchymal EGFR mutant cancers. Although numerous previous reports of FGFR signaling contributing to EGFR TKI resistance in vitro exist, the data have not yet been sufficiently compelling to instigate a clinical trial testing this hypothesis, nor has the role of FGFR in promoting the survival of persister cells been elucidated. In this study, we find that combining EGFR and FGFR inhibitors inhibited the survival and expansion of EGFR mutant drug-tolerant cells over long time periods, preventing the development of fully resistant cancers in multiple vitro models and in vivo. These results suggest that dual EGFR and FGFR blockade may be a promising clinical strategy for both preventing and overcoming EMT-associated acquired drug resistance and provide motivation for the clinical study of combined EGFR and FGFR inhibition in EGFR-mutated NSCLCs.
Cejas P, Drier Y, Dreijerink KMA, Brosens LAA, Deshpande V, Epstein CB, Conemans EB, Morsink FHM, Graham MK, Valk GD, Vriens MR, Fernandez-del Castillo C, Ferrone CR, Adar T, Bowden M, Whitton HJ, Da Silva A, Font-Tello A, Long HW, Gaskell E, Shoresh N, Heaphy CM, Sicinska E, Kulke MH, Chung DC, Bernstein BE, Shivdasani RA. Enhancer signatures stratify and predict outcomes of non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Nat Med 2019;25(8):1260-1265.Abstract
Most pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) do not produce excess hormones and are therefore considered 'non-functional'. As clinical behaviors vary widely and distant metastases are eventually lethal, biological classifications might guide treatment. Using enhancer maps to infer gene regulatory programs, we find that non-functional PNETs fall into two major subtypes, with epigenomes and transcriptomes that partially resemble islet α- and β-cells. Transcription factors ARX and PDX1 specify these normal cells, respectively, and 84% of 142 non-functional PNETs expressed one or the other factor, occasionally both. Among 103 cases, distant relapses occurred almost exclusively in patients with ARXPDX1 tumors and, within this subtype, in cases with alternative lengthening of telomeres. These markedly different outcomes belied similar clinical presentations and histology and, in one cohort, occurred irrespective of MEN1 mutation. This robust molecular stratification provides insight into cell lineage correlates of non-functional PNETs, accurately predicts disease course and can inform postoperative clinical decisions.
2018
Song K-A, Niederst MJ, Lochmann TL, Hata AN, Kitai H, Ham J, Floros KV, Hicks MA, Hu H, Mulvey HE, Drier Y, Heisey DAR, Hughes MT, Patel NU, Lockerman EL, Garcia A, Gillepsie S, Archibald HL, Gomez-Caraballo M, Nulton TJ, Windle BE, Piotrowska Z, Sahingur SE, Taylor SM, Dozmorov M, Sequist LV, Bernstein B, Ebi H, Engelman JA, Faber AC. Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Antagonizes Response to Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer by Suppressing BIM. Clin Cancer Res 2018;24(1):197-208.Abstract
Purpose: Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) confers resistance to a number of targeted therapies and chemotherapies. However, it has been unclear why EMT promotes resistance, thereby impairing progress to overcome it.Experimental Design: We have developed several models of EMT-mediated resistance to EGFR inhibitors (EGFRi) in EGFR-mutant lung cancers to evaluate a novel mechanism of EMT-mediated resistance.Results: We observed that mesenchymal EGFR-mutant lung cancers are resistant to EGFRi-induced apoptosis via insufficient expression of BIM, preventing cell death despite potent suppression of oncogenic signaling following EGFRi treatment. Mechanistically, we observed that the EMT transcription factor ZEB1 inhibits BIM expression by binding directly to the BIM promoter and repressing transcription. Derepression of BIM expression by depletion of ZEB1 or treatment with the BH3 mimetic ABT-263 to enhance "free" cellular BIM levels both led to resensitization of mesenchymal EGFR-mutant cancers to EGFRi. This relationship between EMT and loss of BIM is not restricted to EGFR-mutant lung cancers, as it was also observed in KRAS-mutant lung cancers and large datasets, including different cancer subtypes.Conclusions: Altogether, these data reveal a novel mechanistic link between EMT and resistance to lung cancer targeted therapies. Clin Cancer Res; 24(1); 197-208. ©2017 AACR.
2017
Wang X, Lee RS, Alver BH, Haswell JR, Wang S, Mieczkowski J, Drier Y, Gillespie SM, Archer TC, Wu JN, Tzvetkov EP, Troisi EC, Pomeroy SL, Biegel JA, Tolstorukov MY, Bernstein BE, Park PJ, Roberts CWM. SMARCB1-mediated SWI/SNF complex function is essential for enhancer regulation. Nat Genet 2017;49(2):289-295.Abstract
SMARCB1 (also known as SNF5, INI1, and BAF47), a core subunit of the SWI/SNF (BAF) chromatin-remodeling complex, is inactivated in nearly all pediatric rhabdoid tumors. These aggressive cancers are among the most genomically stable, suggesting an epigenetic mechanism by which SMARCB1 loss drives transformation. Here we show that, despite having indistinguishable mutational landscapes, human rhabdoid tumors exhibit distinct enhancer H3K27ac signatures, which identify remnants of differentiation programs. We show that SMARCB1 is required for the integrity of SWI/SNF complexes and that its loss alters enhancer targeting-markedly impairing SWI/SNF binding to typical enhancers, particularly those required for differentiation, while maintaining SWI/SNF binding at super-enhancers. We show that these retained super-enhancers are essential for rhabdoid tumor survival, including some that are shared by all subtypes, such as SPRY1, and other lineage-specific super-enhancers, such as SOX2 in brain-derived rhabdoid tumors. Taken together, our findings identify a new chromatin-based epigenetic mechanism underlying the tumor-suppressive activity of SMARCB1.
Shah N, Wang P, Wongvipat J, Karthaus WR, Abida W, Armenia J, Rockowitz S, Drier Y, Bernstein BE, Long HW, Freedman ML, Arora VK, Zheng D, Sawyers CL. Regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor via a BET-dependent enhancer drives antiandrogen resistance in prostate cancer. Elife 2017;6Abstract
In prostate cancer, resistance to the antiandrogen enzalutamide (Enz) can occur through bypass of androgen receptor (AR) blockade by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In contrast to fixed genomic alterations, here we show that GR-mediated antiandrogen resistance is adaptive and reversible due to regulation of GR expression by a tissue-specific enhancer. GR expression is silenced in prostate cancer by a combination of AR binding and EZH2-mediated repression at the GR locus, but is restored in advanced prostate cancers upon reversion of both repressive signals. Remarkably, BET bromodomain inhibition resensitizes drug-resistant tumors to Enz by selectively impairing the GR signaling axis via this enhancer. In addition to revealing an underlying molecular mechanism of GR-driven drug resistance, these data suggest that inhibitors of broadly active chromatin-readers could have utility in nuanced clinical contexts of acquired drug resistance with a more favorable therapeutic index.
2016
Lohr JG, Kim S, Gould J, Knoechel B, Drier Y, Cotton MJ, Gray D, Birrer N, Wong B, Ha G, Zhang C-Z, Guo G, Meyerson M, Yee AJ, Boehm JS, Raje N, Golub TR. Genetic interrogation of circulating multiple myeloma cells at single-cell resolution. Sci Transl Med 2016;8(363):363ra147.Abstract
Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable disease, with a treatment-refractory state eventually developing in all patients. Constant clonal evolution and genetic heterogeneity of MM are a likely explanation for the emergence of drug-resistant disease. Monitoring of MM genomic evolution on therapy by serial bone marrow biopsy is unfortunately impractical because it involves an invasive and painful procedure. We describe how noninvasive and highly sensitive isolation and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood at single-cell resolution recapitulate MM in the bone marrow. We demonstrate that CTCs provide the same genetic information as bone marrow MM cells and even reveal mutations with greater sensitivity than bone marrow biopsies in some cases. Single CTC RNA sequencing enables classification of MM and quantitative assessment of genes that are relevant for prognosis. We propose that the genomic characterization of CTCs should be included in clinical trials to follow the emergence of resistant subclones after MM therapy.
Drier Y, Cotton MJ, Williamson KE, Gillespie SM, Ryan RJH, Kluk MJ, Carey CD, Rodig SJ, Sholl LM, Afrogheh AH, Faquin WC, Queimado L, Qi J, Wick MJ, El-Naggar AK, Bradner JE, Moskaluk CA, Aster JC, Knoechel B, Bernstein BE. An oncogenic MYB feedback loop drives alternate cell fates in adenoid cystic carcinoma. Nat Genet 2016;48(3):265-72.Abstract
Translocation events are frequent in cancer and may create chimeric fusions or 'regulatory rearrangements' that drive oncogene overexpression. Here we identify super-enhancer translocations that drive overexpression of the oncogenic transcription factor MYB as a recurrent theme in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Whole-genome sequencing data and chromatin maps highlight distinct chromosomal rearrangements that juxtapose super-enhancers to the MYB locus. Chromosome conformation capture confirms that the translocated enhancers interact with the MYB promoter. Remarkably, MYB protein binds to the translocated enhancers, creating a positive feedback loop that sustains its expression. MYB also binds enhancers that drive different regulatory programs in alternate cell lineages in ACC, cooperating with TP63 in myoepithelial cells and a Notch program in luminal epithelial cells. Bromodomain inhibitors slow tumor growth in ACC primagraft models in vivo. Thus, our study identifies super-enhancer translocations that drive MYB expression and provides insight into downstream MYB functions in alternate ACC lineages.
van Galen P, Viny AD, Ram O, Ryan RJH, Cotton MJ, Donohue L, Sievers C, Drier Y, Liau BB, Gillespie SM, Carroll KM, Cross MB, Levine RL, Bernstein BE. A Multiplexed System for Quantitative Comparisons of Chromatin Landscapes. Mol Cell 2016;61(1):170-80.Abstract
Genome-wide profiling of histone modifications can provide systematic insight into the regulatory elements and programs engaged in a given cell type. However, conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-seq) does not capture quantitative information on histone modification levels, requires large amounts of starting material, and involves tedious processing of each individual sample. Here, we address these limitations with a technology that leverages DNA barcoding to profile chromatin quantitatively and in multiplexed format. We concurrently map relative levels of multiple histone modifications across multiple samples, each comprising as few as a thousand cells. We demonstrate the technology by monitoring dynamic changes following inhibition of p300, EZH2, or KDM5, by linking altered epigenetic landscapes to chromatin regulator mutations, and by mapping active and repressive marks in purified human hematopoietic stem cells. Hence, this technology enables quantitative studies of chromatin state dynamics across rare cell types, genotypes, environmental conditions, and drug treatments.
Flavahan WA*, Drier Y*, Liau BB, Gillespie SM, Venteicher AS, Stemmer-Rachamimov AO, Suvà ML, Bernstein BE. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas. Nature 2016;529(7584):110-4.Abstract

Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas. Mutant IDH protein produces a new onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5'-methylcytosine hydroxylases. TET enzymes catalyse a key step in the removal of DNA methylation. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), although the functional importance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that human IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hypermethylation at cohesin and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to interact aberrantly with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with a demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and downregulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wild-type gliomaspheres upregulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression.

2015
Gagliani N, Vesely MCA, Iseppon A, Brockmann L, Xu H, Palm NW, de Zoete MR, Licona-Limón P, Paiva RS, Ching T, Weaver C, Zi X, Pan X, Fan R, Garmire LX, Cotton MJ, Drier Y, Bernstein B, Geginat J, Stockinger B, Esplugues E, Huber S, Flavell RA. Th17 cells transdifferentiate into regulatory T cells during resolution of inflammation. Nature 2015;523(7559):221-5.Abstract
Inflammation is a beneficial host response to infection but can contribute to inflammatory disease if unregulated. The Th17 lineage of T helper (Th) cells can cause severe human inflammatory diseases. These cells exhibit both instability (they can cease to express their signature cytokine, IL-17A) and plasticity (they can start expressing cytokines typical of other lineages) upon in vitro re-stimulation. However, technical limitations have prevented the transcriptional profiling of pre- and post-conversion Th17 cells ex vivo during immune responses. Thus, it is unknown whether Th17 cell plasticity merely reflects change in expression of a few cytokines, or if Th17 cells physiologically undergo global genetic reprogramming driving their conversion from one T helper cell type to another, a process known as transdifferentiation. Furthermore, although Th17 cell instability/plasticity has been associated with pathogenicity, it is unknown whether this could present a therapeutic opportunity, whereby formerly pathogenic Th17 cells could adopt an anti-inflammatory fate. Here we used two new fate-mapping mouse models to track Th17 cells during immune responses to show that CD4(+) T cells that formerly expressed IL-17A go on to acquire an anti-inflammatory phenotype. The transdifferentiation of Th17 into regulatory T cells was illustrated by a change in their signature transcriptional profile and the acquisition of potent regulatory capacity. Comparisons of the transcriptional profiles of pre- and post-conversion Th17 cells also revealed a role for canonical TGF-β signalling and consequently for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in conversion. Thus, Th17 cells transdifferentiate into regulatory cells, and contribute to the resolution of inflammation. Our data suggest that Th17 cell instability and plasticity is a therapeutic opportunity for inflammatory diseases.
Ryan RJH*, Drier Y*, Whitton H, Cotton MJ, Kaur J, Issner R, Gillespie S, Epstein CB, Nardi V, Sohani AR, Hochberg EP, Bernstein BE. Detection of Enhancer-Associated Rearrangements Reveals Mechanisms of Oncogene Dysregulation in B-cell Lymphoma. Cancer Discovery 2015;5:1058-1071.Abstract

B-cell lymphomas frequently contain genomic rearrangements that lead to oncogene activation by heterologous distal regulatory elements. We used a novel approach called “pinpointing enhancer-associated rearrangements by chromatin immunoprecipitation,” or PEAR-ChIP, to simultaneously map enhancer activity and proximal rearrangements in lymphoma cell lines and patient biopsies. This method detects rearrangements involving known cancer genes, including CCND1, BCL2, MYC, PDCD1LG2, NOTCH1, CIITA, and SGK1, as well as novel enhancer duplication events of likely oncogenic significance. We identify lymphoma subtype–specific enhancers in the MYC locus that are silenced in lymphomas with MYC-activating rearrangements and are associated with germline polymorphisms that alter lymphoma risk. We show that BCL6-locus enhancers are acetylated by the BCL6-activating transcription factor MEF2B, and can undergo genomic duplication, or target the MYC promoter for activation in the context of a “pseudo-double-hit” t(3;8)(q27;q24) rearrangement linking the BCL6 and MYC loci. Our work provides novel insights regarding enhancer-driven oncogene activation in lymphoma.Significance: We demonstrate a novel approach for simultaneous detection of genomic rearrangements and enhancer activity in tumor biopsies. We identify novel mechanisms of enhancer-driven regulation of the oncogenes MYC and BCL6, and show that the BCL6 locus can serve as an enhancer donor in an “enhancer hijacking” translocation. Cancer Discov; 5(10); 1058–71. ©2015 AACR.See related commentary by Mack et al., p. 1018.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1005

2013
Drier Y, Sheffer M, Domany E. Pathway-based personalized analysis of cancer. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2013;110(16):6388-93.Abstract
We introduce Pathifier, an algorithm that infers pathway deregulation scores for each tumor sample on the basis of expression data. This score is determined, in a context-specific manner, for every particular dataset and type of cancer that is being investigated. The algorithm transforms gene-level information into pathway-level information, generating a compact and biologically relevant representation of each sample. We demonstrate the algorithm's performance on three colorectal cancer datasets and two glioblastoma multiforme datasets and show that our multipathway-based representation is reproducible, preserves much of the original information, and allows inference of complex biologically significant information. We discovered several pathways that were significantly associated with survival of glioblastoma patients and two whose scores are predictive of survival in colorectal cancer: CXCR3-mediated signaling and oxidative phosphorylation. We also identified a subclass of proneural and neural glioblastoma with significantly better survival, and an EGF receptor-deregulated subclass of colon cancers.
Baca SC, Prandi D, Lawrence MS, Mosquera JM, Romanel A, Drier Y, Park K, Kitabayashi N, MacDonald TY, Ghandi M, Van Allen E, Kryukov GV, Sboner A, Theurillat J-P, Soong DT, Nickerson E, Auclair D, Tewari A, Beltran H, Onofrio RC, Boysen G, Guiducci C, Barbieri CE, Cibulskis K, Sivachenko A, Carter SL, Saksena G, Voet D, Ramos AH, Winckler W, Cipicchio M, Ardlie K, Kantoff PW, Berger MF, Gabriel SB, Golub TR, Meyerson M, Lander ES, Elemento O, Getz G, Demichelis F, Rubin MA, Garraway LA. Punctuated evolution of prostate cancer genomes. Cell 2013;153(3):666-77.Abstract
The analysis of exonic DNA from prostate cancers has identified recurrently mutated genes, but the spectrum of genome-wide alterations has not been profiled extensively in this disease. We sequenced the genomes of 57 prostate tumors and matched normal tissues to characterize somatic alterations and to study how they accumulate during oncogenesis and progression. By modeling the genesis of genomic rearrangements, we identified abundant DNA translocations and deletions that arise in a highly interdependent manner. This phenomenon, which we term "chromoplexy," frequently accounts for the dysregulation of prostate cancer genes and appears to disrupt multiple cancer genes coordinately. Our modeling suggests that chromoplexy may induce considerable genomic derangement over relatively few events in prostate cancer and other neoplasms, supporting a model of punctuated cancer evolution. By characterizing the clonal hierarchy of genomic lesions in prostate tumors, we charted a path of oncogenic events along which chromoplexy may drive prostate carcinogenesis.
Drier Y, Lawrence MS, Carter SL, Stewart C, Gabriel SB, Lander ES, Meyerson M, Beroukhim R, Getz G. Somatic rearrangements across cancer reveal classes of samples with distinct patterns of DNA breakage and rearrangement-induced hypermutability. Genome Res 2013;23(2):228-35.Abstract
Whole-genome sequencing using massively parallel sequencing technologies enables accurate detection of somatic rearrangements in cancer. Pinpointing large numbers of rearrangement breakpoints to base-pair resolution allows analysis of rearrangement microhomology and genomic location for every sample. Here we analyze 95 tumor genome sequences from breast, head and neck, colorectal, and prostate carcinomas, and from melanoma, multiple myeloma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We discover three genomic factors that are significantly correlated with the distribution of rearrangements: replication time, transcription rate, and GC content. The correlation is complex, and different patterns are observed between tumor types, within tumor types, and even between different types of rearrangements. Mutations in the APC gene correlate with and, hence, potentially contribute to DNA breakage in late-replicating, low %GC, untranscribed regions of the genome. We show that somatic rearrangements display less microhomology than germline rearrangements, and that breakpoint loci are correlated with local hypermutability with a particular enrichment for transversions.
Lawrence MS *, Stojanov P*, Polak P*, Kryukov GV, Cibulskis K, Sivachenko A, Carter SL, Stewart C, Mermel CH, Roberts SA, Kiezun A, Hammerman PS, McKenna A, Drier Y, Zou L, Ramos AH, Pugh TJ, Stransky N, Helman E, Kim J, Sougnez C, Ambrogio L, Nickerson E, Shefler E, Cortés ML, Auclair D, Saksena G, Voet D, Noble M, DiCara D, Lin P, Lichtenstein L, Heiman DI, Fennell T, Imielinski M, Hernandez B, Hodis E, Baca S, Dulak AM, Lohr J, Landau D-A, Wu CJ, Melendez-Zajgla J, Hidalgo-Miranda A, Koren A, McCarroll SA, Mora J, Lee RS, Crompton B, Onofrio R, Parkin M, Winckler W, Ardlie K, Gabriel SB, Roberts CWM, Biegel JA, Stegmaier K, Bass AJ, Garraway LA, Meyerson M, Golub TR, Gordenin DA, Sunyaev S, Lander ES, Getz G. Mutational heterogeneity in cancer and the search for new cancer-associated genes. Nature 2013;499(7457):214-8.Abstract

Major international projects are underway that are aimed at creating a comprehensive catalogue of all the genes responsible for the initiation and progression of cancer. These studies involve the sequencing of matched tumour-normal samples followed by mathematical analysis to identify those genes in which mutations occur more frequently than expected by random chance. Here we describe a fundamental problem with cancer genome studies: as the sample size increases, the list of putatively significant genes produced by current analytical methods burgeons into the hundreds. The list includes many implausible genes (such as those encoding olfactory receptors and the muscle protein titin), suggesting extensive false-positive findings that overshadow true driver events. We show that this problem stems largely from mutational heterogeneity and provide a novel analytical methodology, MutSigCV, for resolving the problem. We apply MutSigCV to exome sequences from 3,083 tumour-normal pairs and discover extraordinary variation in mutation frequency and spectrum within cancer types, which sheds light on mutational processes and disease aetiology, and in mutation frequency across the genome, which is strongly correlated with DNA replication timing and also with transcriptional activity. By incorporating mutational heterogeneity into the analyses, MutSigCV is able to eliminate most of the apparent artefactual findings and enable the identification of genes truly associated with cancer.

2012
Williams LJS, Tabbaa DG, Ali N, Berlin AM, Shea TP, Maccallum I, Lawrence MS, Drier Y, Getz G, Young SK, Jaffe DB, Nusbaum C, Gnirke A. Paired-end sequencing of Fosmid libraries by Illumina. Genome Res 2012;22(11):2241-9.Abstract
Eliminating the bacterial cloning step has been a major factor in the vastly improved efficiency of massively parallel sequencing approaches. However, this also has made it a technical challenge to produce the modern equivalent of the Fosmid- or BAC-end sequences that were crucial for assembling and analyzing complex genomes during the Sanger-based sequencing era. To close this technology gap, we developed Fosill, a method for converting Fosmids to Illumina-compatible jumping libraries. We constructed Fosmid libraries in vectors with Illumina primer sequences and specific nicking sites flanking the cloning site. Our family of pFosill vectors allows multiplex Fosmid cloning of end-tagged genomic fragments without physical size selection and is compatible with standard and multiplex paired-end Illumina sequencing. To excise the bulk of each cloned insert, we introduced two nicks in the vector, translated them into the inserts, and cleaved them. Recircularization of the vector via coligation of insert termini followed by inverse PCR generates a jumping library for paired-end sequencing with 101-base reads. The yield of unique Fosmid-sized jumps is sufficiently high, and the background of short, incorrectly spaced and chimeric artifacts sufficiently low, to enable applications such as mapping of structural variation and scaffolding of de novo assemblies. We demonstrate the power of Fosill to map genome rearrangements in a cancer cell line and identified three fusion genes that were corroborated by RNA-seq data. Our Fosill-powered assembly of the mouse genome has an N50 scaffold length of 17.0 Mb, rivaling the connectivity (16.9 Mb) of the Sanger-sequencing based draft assembly.
Berger MF *, Hodis E*, Heffernan TP*, Deribe YL*, Lawrence MS, Protopopov A, Ivanova E, Watson IR, Nickerson E, Ghosh P, Zhang H, Zeid R, Ren X, Cibulskis K, Sivachenko AY, Wagle N, Sucker A, Sougnez C, Onofrio R, Ambrogio L, Auclair D, Fennell T, Carter SL, Drier Y, Stojanov P, Singer MA, Voet D, Jing R, Saksena G, Barretina J, Ramos AH, Pugh TJ, Stransky N, Parkin M, Winckler W, Mahan S, Ardlie K, Baldwin J, Wargo J, Schadendorf D, Meyerson M, Gabriel SB, Golub TR, Wagner SN, Lander ES, Getz G, Chin L, Garraway LA. Melanoma genome sequencing reveals frequent PREX2 mutations. Nature 2012;485(7399):502-6.Abstract

Melanoma is notable for its metastatic propensity, lethality in the advanced setting and association with ultraviolet exposure early in life. To obtain a comprehensive genomic view of melanoma in humans, we sequenced the genomes of 25 metastatic melanomas and matched germline DNA. A wide range of point mutation rates was observed: lowest in melanomas whose primaries arose on non-ultraviolet-exposed hairless skin of the extremities (3 and 14 per megabase (Mb) of genome), intermediate in those originating from hair-bearing skin of the trunk (5-55 per Mb), and highest in a patient with a documented history of chronic sun exposure (111 per Mb). Analysis of whole-genome sequence data identified PREX2 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchange factor 2)--a PTEN-interacting protein and negative regulator of PTEN in breast cancer--as a significantly mutated gene with a mutation frequency of approximately 14% in an independent extension cohort of 107 human melanomas. PREX2 mutations are biologically relevant, as ectopic expression of mutant PREX2 accelerated tumour formation of immortalized human melanocytes in vivo. Thus, whole-genome sequencing of human melanoma tumours revealed genomic evidence of ultraviolet pathogenesis and discovered a new recurrently mutated gene in melanoma.

2011
Drier Y, Domany E. Do two machine-learning based prognostic signatures for breast cancer capture the same biological processes?. PLoS One 2011;6(3):e17795.Abstract
The fact that there is very little if any overlap between the genes of different prognostic signatures for early-discovery breast cancer is well documented. The reasons for this apparent discrepancy have been explained by the limits of simple machine-learning identification and ranking techniques, and the biological relevance and meaning of the prognostic gene lists was questioned. Subsequently, proponents of the prognostic gene lists claimed that different lists do capture similar underlying biological processes and pathways. The present study places under scrutiny the validity of this claim, for two important gene lists that are at the focus of current large-scale validation efforts. We performed careful enrichment analysis, controlling the effects of multiple testing in a manner which takes into account the nested dependent structure of gene ontologies. In contradiction to several previous publications, we find that the only biological process or pathway for which statistically significant concordance can be claimed is cell proliferation, a process whose relevance and prognostic value was well known long before gene expression profiling. We found that the claims reported by others, of wider concordance between the biological processes captured by the two prognostic signatures studied, were found either to be lacking statistical rigor or were in fact based on addressing some other question.
Chapman MA, Lawrence MS, Keats JJ, Cibulskis K, Sougnez C, Schinzel AC, Harview CL, Brunet J-P, Ahmann GJ, Adli M, Anderson KC, Ardlie KG, Auclair D, Baker A, Bergsagel LP, Bernstein BE, Drier Y, Fonseca R, Gabriel SB, Hofmeister CC, Jagannath S, Jakubowiak AJ, Krishnan A, Levy J, Liefeld T, Lonial S, Mahan S, Mfuko B, Monti S, Perkins LM, Onofrio R, Pugh TJ, Rajkumar VS, Ramos AH, Siegel DS, Sivachenko A, Stewart KA, Trudel S, Vij R, Voet D, Winckler W, Zimmerman T, Carpten J, Trent J, Hahn WC, Garraway LA, Meyerson M, Lander ES, Getz G, Golub TR. Initial genome sequencing and analysis of multiple myeloma. Nature 2011;471(7339):467-72.Abstract
Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignancy of plasma cells, and its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Here we report the massively parallel sequencing of 38 tumour genomes and their comparison to matched normal DNAs. Several new and unexpected oncogenic mechanisms were suggested by the pattern of somatic mutation across the data set. These include the mutation of genes involved in protein translation (seen in nearly half of the patients), genes involved in histone methylation, and genes involved in blood coagulation. In addition, a broader than anticipated role of NF-κB signalling was indicated by mutations in 11 members of the NF-κB pathway. Of potential immediate clinical relevance, activating mutations of the kinase BRAF were observed in 4% of patients, suggesting the evaluation of BRAF inhibitors in multiple myeloma clinical trials. These results indicate that cancer genome sequencing of large collections of samples will yield new insights into cancer not anticipated by existing knowledge.

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